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  • Nigeria's Journalistic Militantism: Putting the Facts in Perspective on how the Press failed Nigeria Setting the Wrong Agenda and Excessively Attacking Ex-President Olusegun Obasanjo By Frisky Larr ()
    Putting the Facts in Perspective on how the Press failed Nigeria setting the wrong agenda and excessively attacking ex-President Olusegun Obasanjo in breach of professional ethics on absolute neutrality! A brief historical guide to the build-up of facts and culmination in the present political dilemma of political uncertainty. A conclusive personal view on the possible way forward for the Nigerian Press.
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  • A New Dawn. A Collection of Speeches of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Vol. 2 by Ad'Obe Obe ()
    The editor of this volume has compiled transcriptions of the Nigerian President's key speeches delivered between May 2000 and May 2001. There are some sixty speeches from a variety of political and state occasions, international summits and conferences, official openings and inaugurations. Reflecting Nigeria's prominence and diverse involvement in sub-regional, pan-African, and global affairs, the speeches, at home and abroad, encompass wide-ranging social, economic, diplomatic, foreign and health policy issues. Examples include: the address at the G15 Summit in Cairo; OAU summit addresses; commentaries on the impacts of globalisation/liberalisation in Nigeria; diplomatic meetings with Russia and the Far East; Budget addresses; meeting Thabo Mbeki, relations with South Africa and Nigeria's role in promoting peace, democracy and prosperity on the continent; and a speech from a pan-African conference on human trafficking and NGO activism.
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  • A New Dawn. A Collection of Speeches of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Vol. 3 By Ad'Obe Obe ()
    The editor of this volume has compiled transcriptions of the Nigerian President's key speeches delivered between May 2000 and May 2001. There are some sixty speeches from a variety of political and state occasions, international summits and conferences, official openings and inaugurations. Reflecting Nigeria's prominence and diverse involvement in sub-regional, pan-African, and global affairs, the speeches, at home and abroad, encompass wide-ranging social, economic, diplomatic, foreign and health policy issues. Examples include: the address at the G15 Summit in Cairo; OAU summit addresses; commentaries on the impacts of globalisation/liberalisation in Nigeria; diplomatic meetings with Russia and the Far East; Budget addresses; meeting Thabo Mbeki, relations with South Africa and Nigeria's role in promoting peace, democracy and prosperity on the continent; and a speech from a pan-African conference on human trafficking and NGO activism.
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    ₦3,000.00
  • Akanda Eda: The Story of Olusegun Obasanjo Edited by Dare Babarinsa ()
    Akanda Eda: The Story of Olusegun Obasanjo provides a window into the enigmatic personality of Nigeria's longest an most famous ruler who has dominated and continue to dominate the affairs of his Country, moderating its sometimes turbulent temper and projecting its power and prestige all over the world.
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  • Nzeogwu: An Intimate Portrait of Major Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu By Olusegun Obasanjo ()
    Nzeogwu, the biography of Major Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu, written by his best-known friend, General Olusegun Obasanjo, makes an interesting reading in this respect. There could be dozens of hypotheses on January 15, 1966 coup. Many commentators, like Kirk-Greene in Crisis and Conflict in Nigeria I, said, “The truth will never be satisfactorily established”, given the death of its chief actors. Many of those hypotheses were postulated not to explain, but to conceal the truth for sheer mischief in some intellectual-cum-political provinces. What cannot be disputed, however, was the role played by Nzeogwu, its principal architect. His published biography has given additional insights into the personal traits that led to the unfortunate event.
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  • The President Explains: Olusegun Obasanjo (1999-2007) ()
    The critical election of Chief Olusegun Aremu Obasanjo in 1999 will continue to generate interest and comments especially among political historians and researchers alike because it was a watershed in the nation’s political evolution. Looking back, Obasanjo’s mandate gave expression to the burning desire by the Nigerian people to have democracy rather than prolonged military rule. It was also a mark of conviction among the strategic power elite that he had the leadership credentials to restore waning hope and stabilise the polity. Of course, the effective revival of the nation’s economy was also germane.

    In all this, it was instructive that the former president would have to democratise leadership and governance because democracy, particularly in a plural setting, will only be useful to the extent that it engenders popular participation. Fortuitously, the idea that Chief Obasanjo speaks with the generality of the people on his programmes and policies via Radio Nigeria was born, running in the process, 15 editions of robust engagements and uncensored interactions with every category of the populace in a monthly programme known as The President Explains.

    Perhaps in an attempt to preserve his legacy, the former president has now published the substantive issues in the programme in a book form retaining the title: The President Explains. The 389-page work jointly published by Radio Nigeria and Sola Ojewusi and Associates in association with Attorney Owolabi Salis (Salis Law P.C. Broadway, New York) is in fifteen chapters with a postscript on the history of the programme as narrated by the production crew.

    Former Director-General of Radio Nigeria, Dr. Eddie Iroh, who originated the idea of the programme and his successor, Barrister Yusuf Nuhu, wrote their different perspectives on the utility of the programme while the renowned scholar, Professor Akin Mabogunje, presented the book in a thought-provoking foreword. Each chapter opens with an abstract introducing the various topics and ends with a selection of topical comments grouped under the banner: Words on marble. A quick reference.

    The subsisting challenge of job creation is the focus in Chapter One. Through the Poverty Alleviation Programme, a nation-wide emergency action to reduce the incidence of mass poverty, government provided financial incentives to skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled individuals to at least engage them in commercial activities or direct employment.

    In the second chapter, Labour, Productivity and Work Ethics gained attention. As with the remaining chapters, the topic was preceded by the former president’s reactions to the various questions sent in by listeners or participants in previous topics—giving practical meaning and participatory relevance to the entire book.

    Evoking the spirit of patriotism and nationalism, Obasanjo in Chapter Three, addresses the subject: What is in it for Nigeria? Here, he speaks to the soul of the nation, challenging the citizenry to fully embrace the fundamentals of nation-building. Thus rather than asking “what is in it for me”, conscientious patriots should ask “what is in it for Nigeria”, adding with a measured concern that the only way to achieve national rebirth is to put away the “mock and mess” of the past. The former president was emphatic that selfish tendencies begat corruption and corruption in turn begat national decay.

    The book goes on to the 15th chapter and it discusses different issues of national importance during Obasanjo’s regime.

    Therefore, The President Explains, is a welcome addition to our national history— with 20 pages of colour pictures of Obasanjo over the years, covering his local strides and relevance on the global stage. The sharp print in hard cover is excellent and the interrelated issues covered in the book also remain vital in any serious efforts toward national reawakening and development—be it in policy dimension or leadership attributes. Expectedly, controversy is inevitable here as the book further raises pertinent and subsisting issues in our national conversation. But in an environment where leaders rarely document their stewardship in memoir or any written form, the publication is significant.
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    ₦12,000.00
  • Olusegun Obasanjo The Presidential Legacy 1999 - 2007 vol. 1 & vol. 2 By Ladipo Akinkugbe ()
    Writing about the Obasanjo years compels rather more than the Presidential Legacy. These two volumes focus on what he found on the table as he came in as President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and what he left on that table in 2007.
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  • Leadership for Africa: in honor of Olusegun Obasanjo on the occasion of his 60th birthday ()
    I. Personal Tributes  
    Joaquim Alberto Chissano CONSEQUENT WITH HIS WORDS 19
    Jimmy Carter TO GENERAL OLUSEGUN OBASANJO 23
    King Moshoeshoe II WE NEED HIS WIDE EXPERIENCE 25
    Mohammadu Buhari A SALUTE TO GENERAL OBASANJO 29
    Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi FATHER OF THE CONTINENT 31
    Flora Lewis 33
    THE FUTURE WILL BE ON HIS SIDE FOR NIGERIANS, A VOICE OF CONFIDENCE THAT MUSTN'T BE SILENCED 35
    Jonathan Power THEY'VE LOCKED UP AFRICA'S GREATEST POLITICAL FIGURE 37
    Babacar N'Diaye TRIBUTE TO A VISIONARY LEADER 39
    Boubakar Diaby-Ouattara LETTER TO GENERAL OBASANJO 41
    Layashi Yaker AN ARDENT LEADER 45
    Mario Graça do Machungo WISHES FOR A LONG LIFE AND SUCCESS 49
    Ted Turner LETTER TO GENERAL OBASANJO 47
    Shridath S. Ramphal HOMAGE TO GENERAL OLUSEGUN OBASANJO 53
    Roelof F. (Pik) Botha HIS SOUTH AFRICAN CONNECTION 55
    Jeremy Pope IMAGES OF A NIGERIAN IN APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA 71
    Colin Eglin A GREAT HUMAN BEING AND A TRUE DEMOCRAT 75
    Robert von Lucius  79
    "ARCHAIC ROCK"— MEDIATOR FOR A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA URGESTEIN 83
    Emmanuel A. Erskine MY HEARTIEST CONGRATULATIONS 85
    Ad'Obe Obe A COMMITTED OPTIMIST 87
    Carol Lancaster  A LEADER FOR AFRICA AND THE WORLD 91
    Bona Malwal AFRICA'S BEST KNOWN SOLDIER, DIPLOMAT AND STATESMAN 93
    Erne Awa AMBASSADOR-EXTRAORDINARY FOR AFRICA 97
    Chief Afe Babalola GENERAL OLUSEGUN OBASANJO AS AN EXEMPLAR 101
    Onukaba Adinoyi Ojo THE CAUTIOUS REFORMER 109
    Yohei Sasakawa DEAR GENERAL OBASANJO 115
    Olatunji Dare  THESIS ON GENERAL OLUSEGUN OBASANJO 117
    Tunji Abayomi IN HONOUR OF A MAN OF MANY MEANINGS 119
    Joan Holmes A GREAT SON OF AFRICA 125
    Abul Maal A Muhith NO TIME TO WASTE, NO TIME TO REST 127
    Tunji Lardner OUR GENERAL 131
    Francois van Hoek LETTER 135
    Chief Jonathan Adio Obafemi Olopade THE MAN OBASANJO—A DISCRETE NEGOTIATOR AND MEDIATOR 137
    Ayodele Aderinwale THE ESSENCE OF OBASANJO 139
    Terencia Leon-Joseph THE ABILITY TO RESPECT OTHERS 145
    Mehri Madarshahi LETTER TO GENERAL OBASANJO 147
    Magemeso Namungalu THE UNIQUE GENERAL 151
    II. Africa's Leadership Challenge  
    Ali A. Mazrui POLITICAL LEADERSHIP IN AFRICA: SEVEN STYLES AND FOUR TRADITIONS 161
    Reginald Herbold Green AFRICAN LEADERSHIP FOR AFRICAN AGENDAS 165
    Francis M. Deng LEADERSHIP BEYOND POWER: THE OBASANJO MODEL 171
    Oyeleye Oyediran THE MILITARY AND POLITICAL TRANSITION IN AFRICA: 181
    THE OBASANJO MODEL Ibrahim Agboola Gambari 183
    THE SPECTRE OF MARGINALIZATION OF AFRICA IN THE EMERGING NEW WORLD ORDER: A PERSONAL REFLECTION Gabriel O. Olusanya 187
    AFRICA: WHAT FUTURE? Hansd'Orville 193
    THE NEW CHALLENGES OF GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS Dragoljub Najman  197
    DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNANCE IN AFRICA Transparency International 203
    LETTER Peter Eigen  205
    THE "MORAL RELATIVITY" OF CORRUPTION Ednan Agaev  215
    NORTH-SOUTH; THE NEED FOR A CO-OPERATION STRATEGY Peter Anyang'Nyong'o 219
    THE CHALLENGE OF NATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND DEMOCRATIC CHANGE IN KENYA  
    III. Africa's Development Challenge  
    Chief Emeka Anyaoku THE IMAGE OF AFRICA 229
    Robert S. McNamara SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAS DEVELOPMENT CRISIS 235
    Per Pinstrup-Andersen FOOD SECURITY IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA 241
    Ellen Johnson Sirleaf THE LEADERSHIP DIMENSION OF AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT 247
    Babafemi A. Badejo  257
    THE ASSOCIATIVE SECTOR AND THE POOR IN AFRICA Pierre Claver Damiba 271
    INTRODUCING CULTURAL FACTORS INTO DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA Thomas R. Odhiambo 281
    THE MILITARY DIMENSION OF THE AFRICAN SCIENCE ENTERPRISE Jean F. Freymond 289
    AN AGENDA FOR THE COMING YEARS LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS  295
    CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS  297

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    ₦16,000.00
  • Watch the Watcher: A Book of Remembrance of Obasanjo Years By Yinka Odumakin ()
    PASTOR TUNDE BAKARE'S WARNING TO THE NATION IN 1999

    On March 7,1999, following the election of General Olusegun Obasanjo as the President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Pastor Tunde Bakare in a message titled. "No More Walls" shared the vision he saw with the entire nation:

    Rejoice not oh land, or your joy will be temporary. For I am bringing the nation, Nigeria, the rulers, the priests and the prophets there, to my threshing floor. I will judge Saul and his comrades, and after I have finished my purging, then I will restore to you permanent joy. Obasanjo is not your messiah. He is King Agag and the prophetic axe will fall upon his head before May 29. And I asked. "Lord. How are you going to judge Saul and what has be done?" God said, "I sent him on an assignment to overtake, to recover, to demolish but he didn't. He spared the fat calves, he spared the big sheep and he brought Agag back to Jerusalem. I will judge Saul and his comrades and after I have finished my purging, then your joy will be permanent.

    Pastor Bakare followed up later in a message entitled. 'Nigeria, A Nation Given To A Lying Propaganda," with a stern warning that three things would characterize Obasanjo's regime:

    •    The family situation in Nigeria will collapse.

    •    Just like in the days of Ahab. there will be economic crimes perpetrated more than ever before.

    •    The occult movement will gain momentum that it will almost become impossible to stop it.

    We are living witnesses that everything stated in Pastor Bakare's messages came to pass during Obasanjo's regime. Family life collapsed during Obasanjo's regime to the point that his own son accused him of sleeping with his wife. Under Obasanjo's watch. Transparency International (Tl) voted Nigeria as the most corrupt country in the world. The level of blood- letting under his regime remains unparalleled in Nigeria's history, save the civil war years and Boko Haram killings.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    The author, Yinka Odumakin, is a political activist, journalist, and a media consultant. He has been on the Nigerian political scene for about three decades. He is married to the Civil Rights Campaigner, Dr Joe-Okei Odumakin.

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  • My Watch – A Memoir by Olusegun Obasanjo (3 Vols) ()
    "During his watch, a watchman has no sleep and no respite."
    - Olusegun Obasanjo

    Following in the steps of his previous memoirs, My Command and Not My Will, Olusegun Obasanjo's My Watch is more than the story of the Obasanjo presidency told by the man himself. It is a memoir of a lifetime spent in service to country, of a man who has been destined with the watch, with the vigilance, with the responsibility to his people to speak up and speak out.

    My Watch spans large expanses of time, from the pre-colonial Owu history, to early Abeokuta and the last throes of an independent city state at turn-of-the-century colonial Nigeria, to the early life of its author, his civil war experience, his stewardship of the transitional government of 1976-1979, the interregnum, his second appearance on the national scene as a civilian president on Nigeria's return to democracy in 1999, the completion of the first civilian-civilian transfer of government in Nigeria's history that inaugurated the Yar'Adua presidency and signalled the end of Obasanjo's tenure in office, and the years hence.

    Presented in three volumes, this exquisitely narrated memoir, in turns intensely personal and broadly nationalistic and international, completes a trilogy of autobiographies—My Command, Not My Will, and My Watch—told by this sojourner of Nigerian and world history.
     

    Book Info

    Publisher: Kachifo Limited under its Prestige Imprint
    Year of first release: 2014
    Planned release date: November 2014
    The book is presented as a three-volume boxset in hardcase and paperback editions. The book is trimmed at 150x235mm, portrait. The page counts are 506, 672, and 400 pages respectively for Volumes 1, 2, and 3. We present a well-designed, illustrated in full colour where relevant, and factual memoir written by the man himself.

    Author's Bio

    Olusegun Obasanjo, soldier, statesman, author and farmer, born on Ifo Market Day in Ibogun-Olaogun in what was then Abeokuta Province of 1930s colonial Nigeria, joined the Nigerian Army in 1958. He served in the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in the Congo between 1960-1961 and rose to become the General Officer Commanding the 3 Marine Commando Division of the Nigerian Army, which ended the 30-month Nigerian Civil War.

    After the war, Obasanjo resumed his duties as the commander of the Nigerian Army Corps of Engineers. He was appointed Federal Commissioner (Minister) for Works in the Gowon Administration, and was appointed Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters—thus becoming the number 2 man in the government hierarchy—after the change of government in 1975.

    Obasanjo served as Head of State of the Federal Military Government and Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces from 1976-1979 following the assassination of General Murtala Muhammed in a failed putsch. He handed over to a civilian regime in 1979 and retired to private life of farming. As a statesman he was called upon by the international community, in one instance to serve as co-chair of the Commonwealth Eminent Persons' Group constituted to work on negotiated settlement for the ending of the South African Apartheid policy in 1985. He was also a candidate for the office of Secretary-General of the United Nations in 1991.

    Olusegun Obasanjo, a fearless critic of bad government in Africa and particularly in Nigeria, was jailed after the "phantom coup" trial in 1995 by the Abacha Military Regime. He emerged from prison in 1998 and became a candidate for the presidency in the run-up to the military handover to a democratic civilian administration. He won the election and was sworn-in as President of the Federal Republic of Nigerian on May 29 1999.

    He stepped down from the presidency in 2007 at the end of his second term and returned to his farm. He still serves the international community in several capacities. He is currently the chief promoter of the Olusegun Obasanjo Presidential Library.

    Olusegun Obasanjo has authored several books, significant amongst them, My Command, about his experiences in the Nigerian Civil War; Not My Will, about his service to the nation as Military Head of State; This Animal Called Man, a philosophical reflection on the nature of man written during his time as a political prisoner; and Nzeogwu, about his friend and key figure in the January 1966 coup. This book, My Watch, his latest memoir, promises to join the other books as odes to a life of service to God, humanity and country.

    Table of Contents
     
    VOLUME 1: My Watch - Early Life and the Military
    Introduction
     
    Part I: Early Life
    1)         Ifo Market Day

    1. The Owus in Yorubaland
    2. The Family
    3. Village Life
    4. From Village to City
    5. The City of Abeokuta
    6. Ibadan- The Oluyole City
     
    Part II: Military Career and Administration

    1. Teshie - The Beginning of a Career
    2. From Dream to Reality: Going to the UK
    3. Close to Active Military Operation
    4. Returning Home
    5. Kaduna-The Cosmopolitan City of Crocodiles
    6. The Congo
    7. From Infantry to Corps of Engineers
    8. Assuming Command of Engineers Unit
    9. The Indian Staff College Course
    10. The First Coup And Its Aftermath
    11. Ibadan On Military Assignment
    12. The Nigerian Civil War
    13. The Royal College of Defence Studies
    14. First Step Into Government
    15. The Third Coup
     
    Part III: Life After Military Administration

    1. The Inter-regnum
    2. Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group on South Africa
    3. The Race to the 38th Floor
    4. National Unity Organisation of Nigeria (NUON)
    5. My Arrest: The Abacha Saga
    6. The Prison Experience
     
     
    VOLUME 2: My Watch - Political and Public Affairs
                                       
    Part IV: Second Coming – Politics & Political Affairs

    1. Entry Into Politics
    2. Political Consultations and Convention
    3. Campaigns and the Elections
    4. Planning & Preparation for Governance
    5. Beginning of Governance
    6. Constitution Amendments
    7. The External Dimensions
    8. Atiku and US Justice Entanglement
    9. Succession, Transition and Exit
     
    Part V: Second Coming - Governance

    1. Credo and Orientation
    1. Credo
    2. Worship
    3. Death of Stella
    1. Judicial Commission
    1. Investigation of Human Rights Violations – Oputa Panel
    1. Conflict Resolutions
    1. Bakassi
    2. Militancy in the Niger Delta
    3. Internal Conflicts
    4. Regional Conflicts and Relations
    1. Fuel, Energy & Power Reforms
    1. Fuel Shortage
    2. Oil & Gas, Local Content, Marginal Fields
    3. Power & Energy
    1. Economic Reforms
    1. Transportation
    2. Privatisation
    3. Agriculture & Presidential Initiatives
    4. Tourism
    5. Debt Relief
    6. Needs & Vision 2020
    1. Financial Management Reforms
    1. Fighting Corruption
    2. Wage Increase
    3. Monetisation
    4. Contributory Pension Scheme
    5. Recovery of Looted Funds
    6. Price Intelligence Unit
    7. Banking Reform
    1. Social Welfare Services Reforms
    1. National Health Insurance Scheme, NHIS
    2. Polio Immunisation
    3. National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control, NAFDAC
    4. Millennium Development Goals, MDGs
    5. Universal Basic Education, UBE
    6. Housing and Urban Development
    7. Census 2006
    1. Civil Service Reforms
    1. Federal Capital Development Authority, FCDA
    2. Local Government Councils
    3. e-Government
    4. SERVICOM
    1. Administrative Enhancement
    1. Independent Policy Group, IPG
    2. Informal Inner Circle in Governance  (Kitchen Cabinet)
    3. Honorary Presidential Advisory Councils & Other Committees
    4. Executive-Legislative Relations
    5. Visits to States
    6. Improving the National Image
    7. Stated Goals and Proven Performance
     
    VOLUME 3: My Watch -Now and Then
     
    Part VI: Now and Thereafter

    1. Stand Up and Look
    2. Critical Assessment of Yar’Adua Administration
    3. Special Envoy of UN Secretary-General in DRC and Great Lakes Region
    4. To Be Or Not To Be: Jonathan
    5. The Presidential Library
    6. The Nigeria Centenary
    7. The Media and The Critics
    8. Global Events, Involvement in Note-Worthy Organisations and Leaders
    9. Elections Observations
    10. The Missed, the Missing and the Lost Chances
    11. From Now To...
    12. Epilogue
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