Wole Soyinkas

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  • The Politics of Wole Soyinka By Tunde Adeniran ()
    The first edition of THE POLITICS OF WOLE SOYINKA was published specifically as a preliminary study to commemorate the 60th birthday of the Nobel Laureate. It has now been updated to mark his 80th birthday. The book blends some psycho-analytic techniques with deductive analysis and practical observations to bring to the reader a perspective on the motivation, content and form of Soyinka's direct and indirect involvement in politics at home and abroad. Students of various disciplines – especially psychology, political science and literature – will find this book most invaluable. It also contains a lot of fascinating information and insight for the general public.
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  • Interventions Vol. III By Wole Soyinka ()
    This compilation contains three lectures delivered by Professor Wole Soyinka on recent developments in the Nigerian polity which call for well-informed critical analysis. And, true to the very nature of the great writer, these essays are nothing short of intelligence, eloquence and profundity.
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  • Aké: The Years of Childhood: Wole Soyinka’s Memoir ()
    Aké, the first volume of Nigerian Nobel prize winner Wole Soyinka's (possibly slightly fictionalized) autobiography, is the first book of his I've read. For most authors, an autobiography is probably not the best place to start; most of the time, I want a reason to care about what the author has done before getting into his life story.

    In this case, though, it doesn't disappoint at all. Aké chronicles young Wole's childhood up to about 11 years of age, and given that he was born in 1934, that's a fairly tumultuous time. While the world war rages somewhere just beyond the horizon, Nigeria is somewhere in between the old ways and the new ones, stuck between old tribal kingdoms and the new world, the old religion and Christianity, the old language and English, still ruled by the British but beginning to find a new identity of its own - which isn't an easy process, as shown by the occasional sobering flash-forward to Nigeria in the early 80s.

    Ake tells the story of Wole Soyinka's first eleven years as a child (1934–1945), a period that coincides with major historical events in Nigeria, and around the world – World War II and the famous Women's Uprising in Egbaland, an event in which the author played the role of a courier.

    Told, of course, with the benefit of hindsight, the story of Ake is rich, and the wit is bold and blithe. His touching and vivid evocation of the colourful sights, sounds, and aromas of the world that shaped him is lyrical, laced with humour and adorned with the sheer delight of a child's-eye view.

    This account contains invaluable and delightful vignettes of some of the individuals and events which were to shape the future political and human rights activist, and Nobel Laureate.

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  • Interventions IV By Wole Soyinka ()
    The Nigerian state is bedevilled by various scourges: the constant thirst for and abuse of power by governments and individuals alike, is posing a great threat to freedom more than ever before in the country; Religion is in a perpetual supremacy contest with Nationhood; and 'Rituals' the latest being the Nigerian Centenary Celebration have come to be very effective in concealing the reality of decay going on around. And where is the average Nigerian in all these? Obscured.

    And the so-called heroes among them? They have been dismissed and shouted into anonymity by the very ones who are supposed to lend them their voices.

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  • The interpreters By Wole Soyinka ()
    The interpreters, written by Wole Soyinka in 1965, divided into two parts, is a social realism which major theme centres on the post-independence moral decadence that plagues the Nigerian society, up-till date, attempted to be solved by the Nigerians who had just returned from studies abroad. Each of the main characters is engaged in the enterprise of interpreting himself in relation to the society in which he lives, in an attempt to discover the right way to live. The narrative is, as a result, multi-stranded and employs a shifting, subjective time-scale, and in some aspects, the narrative situation used is figural, sometimes resulting in flashbacks; rendered with an intense use of language somewhat complex and metaphorical. The novel has its settings in Lagos and University of Ibadan. There is a range of character types in The Interpreters in that each of the main personae has an individual way of interpreting the world, though of course, due to their association with each other, there is a degree of commonality in some respects, both in the sense of shared experience and of quality of experience as intellectuals, though with some exceptions. However, their interpretations tilted towards the same thought stemming from shared experiences as intellectuals, except Kola. They bear the burden of the author’s worries and emphasis on indecision. They collectively and helplessly search for self-identity as a way out of the identity crisis and lack of moral stance.
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  • Ibadan: The Penkelemes Years By Wole Soyinka ()
    Fresh from his studies in the UK, Maren, the protagonist of Ibadan: The Penkelemes Years, and Wole Soyinka's alter ego, takes a job at the University of Ibadan. Maren soon begins to feel an acute sense of outrage at injustices for which he will inevitably be at loggerheads with the authorities. Before long, he is drawn into the unfolding political maelstrom of the Western Region.

    Linking events – national and international – over a 20-year period, and personal experiences, this third volume of Wole Soyinka's memoirs is a wonderful parlay of 'faction', to produce a vividly compelling autobiography.
    Fresh from his studies in the UK, Maren, the protagonist of Ibadan: The Penkelemes Years, and Wole Soyinka's alter ego, takes a job at the University of Ibadan. Maren soon begins to feel an acute sense of outrage at injustices for which he will inevitably be at loggerheads with the authorities. Before long, he is drawn into the unfolding political maelstrom of the Western Region.

    Linking events – national and international – over a 20-year period, and personal experiences, this third volume of Wole Soyinka's memoirs is a wonderful parlay of 'faction', to produce a vividly compelling autobiography. - See more at: http://www.sunshinebookseller.com/_item?item_id=5794179451977728#sthash.Q1fk3TIU.dpuf
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  • Crucible of the Ages - Essays in Honour of Wole Soyinka at 80 by Ivor Agyeman - Duah & Ogochukwu Promise ()
    A truly unique compendium, the essayists include three African leaders, three Nobel Laureates, distinguished playwrights, novelists, literary critics, historians, academics and public policy practitioners from around the world.

    Among the contributors are Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Nadine Gordimer, Margaret Busby, Nicholas Westcott, Toni Morrison, Ama Ata Aidoo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Kwame Anthony Appiah, Ali Mazrui, Derek Walcott, Atukwei Okai, Cameron Duodu, Yemi Ogunbiyi, Toyin Falola, King of Asante, Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, President of the Republic of Ghana, John Mahama and former South Africa President Thabo Mbeki.

    ...a valuable publication that should stand the test of all intellectual rigours and, in the end, should be read by every African... It is, above all, a timely volume with majestic, priceless and supreme intellectual importance."
    –A.B. Assensoh PhD, Indiana University Professor Emeritus and Courtesy Professor of History, University of Oregon-Eugene, USA
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  • African Theatre: Soyinka: Blackout, Blowout and Beyond ()
    Publishes for the first time Nobel Prize winner Wole Soyinka's early revue sketches on which his later plays, The Beatification of Area Boy and King Baabu, draw strongly for characters and situations.
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  • Early Soyinka By Bernth Lindfors ()
    Early Soyinka endeavors to reveal Wole Soyinka’s precocious talent as a writer of stories, dramas, essays, letters, humorous sketches and jokes, by presenting a collection of essays on writings by Soyinka composed prior to publication of his first books in 1963. The underlying argument in the book appears to be that Soyinka’s early works cannot be considered as “juvenilia or immature scribblings” for they already display a high command of language and acceptable formal structures.

    The introduction lays out the background of the book when Bernth Lindfors attempts to settle a score with Biodun Jeyifo and Soyinka. Lindfors first retells Jeyifo’s position in Wole Soyinka: Politics, Poetics and Postcolonialism (2004), in which the latter identified Lindfors as one “who, almost alone among students of Soyinka’s writings, has been obsessed with his literary juvenilia, hoping therein to find materials to prove Soyinka was once a rookie writer, a neophyte artist, even if his rise to fame seemed instantaneous and meteoric.” Then, Lindfors reveals Soyinka’s misunderstanding of his efforts to demonstrate that Soyinka’s earliest writings were not the “awkward fumblings of a neophyte artist but the handiwork of a skilled craftsman who could articulate original ideas with fluency, precision and persuasiveness.” Soyinka had apparently taken issue with Lindfors in his essay “The Critic and Society: Barthes, Leftocracy and Other Mythologies,” by branding the latter as a “hagiographer extraordinary, who re-creates my juvenilia, in the old University College of Ibadan; every page of his essay contains at least one inaccuracy of time and place and a series of absurd attributions.” Lindfors’ probable purpose in bringing out these two misinterpretations of his interest in that early expressive body of work is to show the reason why many critics have refrained from studying Soyinka’s writings prior to publication of A Dance of the Forests, The Lion and the Jewel, and Three Plays in 1963. By considering these first published works as the starting point for an exploration of Soyinka’s talent and personality, those critics have been “studying the growth of a tree without examining its roots.” Early Soyinka aims then at putting things right by studying the growth of Soyinka from a close examination of his roots.

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  • From Zia with Love By Wole Soyinka ()
    "Unquestionably Africa's most versatile writer and arguably one of her finest." (New York Times Book Review) When the Military decrees that a crime carrying a prison sentence now retroactively warrants summary execution, confusion and fear permeate a society where the brutality and injustice of military rule is parodied by life inside prison. Based on events in Nigeria in the early 1980s Wole Soyinka's stage play From Zia with Love and radio play A Scourge of Hyacinths, were produced in the early 90s when the writer was exiled by Sani Abacha's notorious and unjust military regime.
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  • Salutation to the Gut By Wole Soyinka ()
    Previously unpublished, Salutation to the Gut is an essay Soyinka wrote more than forty years ago. The essay is a celebration of Yoruba culture, in particular Yoruba food and gastronomic culture. Its witty and whimsical style foreshadows the kind of writing that would become Soyinka's hallmark, and for which he would subsequently win the Nobel Prize for Literature.
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  • ALAPATA APATA: A Play for Yorubafonia, Class for Xenophiles By Wole Soyinka ()
    After an exceptionally successful career as a butcher; Alaba, the protagonist of this play decided that he deserves a life of quite retirement. Unfortunately beneath the rock on which he has chosen to make his abode are precious mineral deposits. Soon, both Alaba and the rock become a place of more than passing interest to everyone – from the lowly, to denizens of power: The outcome of this rollicking drama is more than anyone, least of all, Alaba himself, bargained for:

    Wole Soyinka’s latest play, is a powerful satire of the idiosyncrasies and excesses of our contemporary Nigeria society; the corruption of power; opportunism and cultural alienation.
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  • The Deceptive Silence of Stolen Voices By Wole Soyinka ()
    Nigeria as a country is bedevilled by myriads of paradoxes. These unite to dwarf its stature and hence there have been popular calls for a National Conference. Yet the powers-that-be oppose its convening with overt recalcitrance prompting Soyinka at Emeka Anyaoku's 70'" Birthday to articulate his position once again and ask "Will the National Conference open up a Pandora's Box?"
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  • Death and the King's Horseman By Wole Soyinka ()
    Death and the King's Horseman is a play by Wole Soyinka based on a real incident that took place in Nigeria during British colonial rule: the ritual suicide of the horseman of an important chief was prevented by the intervention of the colonial authorities. In addition to the British intervention, Soyinka calls the horseman's own conviction toward suicide into question, posing a problem that throws off the community's balance.
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  • The Lion and the Jewel By Wole Soyinka ()
    The Lion and the Jewel is a play by Wole Soyinka first performed in 1959. It chronicles how Baroka, the lion, fights with the modern Lakunle over the right to marry Sidi, the titular Jewel. Lakunle is portrayed as the civilized antithesis of Baroka and unilaterally attempts to modernize his community and change its social conventions for no reason other than the fact that he can. The transcript of the play was first published in 1962 by Oxford University Press. Soyinka emphasises the theme of the corrupted African culture through the play as well as how the youth should embrace the original African culture.
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  • The Strong Breed By Wole Soyinka ()
    The Strong Breed is one of the best known plays by Wole Soyinka. It is a tragedy that ends with an individual sacrifice for the sake of the communal benefit. The play is centered on the tradition of egungun, a Yoruba festival tradition in which a scapegoat of the village carries out the evil of the community and is exiled from the civilization. Eman, the play's protagonist, takes on the role of "carrier", knowing it will result in beating and exile. He does this to spare a young simpleton the same fate. The ritual takes an unexpected turn as Eman flees. His pursuers set a trap for him that results in his death.
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  • The Jero Plays By Wole Soyinka ()
    The Jero Plays by Wole Soyinka consist of two short plays re-released as a collection in 1973. The Trials of Brother Jero first came out in 1964, while Jero’s Metamorphosis was published two years later in 1966. Both plays satirize Christianity and religious hypocrisy, particularly, the unquestioning devotion that many converts display towards their spiritual leaders, often exposing themselves to manipulation in the process.

    As the title suggests, The Trials of Brother Jero is about a charlatan preacher, Brother Jero.  Brother Jero is a cunning beach diviner who woos customers (penitents) to his church by using Christian superstition for his own salvation. For him, the church is a business. He says:

     ‘I am glad I got here before any customers-I mean worshipers..  l always get a feeling every morning that am a shopkeeper waiting for customers.’

    Brother Jero is suave while his followers are gullible. He lures people to his church by promising them material gains and promotions through prayer. Chume his assistant often seeks for permission to beat his arrogant wife Amope but Brother Jero disagrees:

    ‘ I keep my followers dissatisfied because if they are satisfied, they won’t come again..’

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  • Mandela's Earth and Other Poems By Wole Soyinka ()
    This was Soyinka's first collection of poems after winning the Noble prize in literature in 1986 and it is like a political collection as well as a poetic work.
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  • Poem Of Black Africa By Wole Soyinka ()
    Poems of Black Africa is a poetry anthology edited by Wole Soyinka, and published in 1975 (see 1975 in poetry) as part of the Heinemann African Writers Series. It was arranged by theme.
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  • The Burden of Memory By Wole Soyinka ()
    When Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka's The Open Sore of a Continent appeared in 1996, it received rave reviews in the national media. Now comes Soyinka's powerful sequel to that fearless and passionate book, The Burden of Memory. Where Open Sore offered a critique of African nationhood and a searing indictment of the Nigerian military and its repression of human and civil rights, The Burden of Memory considers all of Africa--indeed, all the world--as it poses the next logical question: Once repression stops, is reconciliation between oppressor and victim possible? In the face of centuries long devastations wrought on the African continent and her Diaspora by slavery, colonialism, Apartheid and the manifold faces of racism what form of recompense could possibly be adequate? In a voice as eloquent and humane as it is forceful, Soyinka examines this fundamental question as he illuminates the principle duty and "near intolerable burden" of memory to bear the record of injustice. In so doing, he challenges notions of simple forgiveness, of confession and absolution, as strategies for social healing. Ultimately, he turns to art--poetry, music, painting--as one source that may nourish the seed of reconciliation, art as the generous vessel that can hold together the burden of memory and the hope of forgiveness. Based on Soyinka's Stewart-McMillan lectures delivered at the Du Bois Institute at Harvard, The Burden of Memory speaks not only to those concerned specifically with African politics, but also to anyone seeking the path to social justice through some of history's most inhospitable terrain.
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  • The Man Died: Prison Notes of Wole Soyinka By Wole Soyinka ()
    A savage, stabbing inquiry, not into human nature proper, but into human nature viewed through the concave mirrors of solitary confinement and human evil, stretched and warped into horrible familiarity. Soyinka is hard to read, if you read him straight -- this book is most effective when you enter into its twisting, doubling corridors and let Soyinka transform your mind and introspection into a prison of your own. Like most great books, this one works on several levels: an indictment of political injustice, a pyschological study of the prisoner, and (pardon the cliche) a metaphor for the human condition. Brilliant and haunting.

    During the Nigerian Civil War (1967–1970) Wole Soyinka was arrested and incarcerated for twenty-two months, most of it spent in solitary confinement in a cell, 4ft by 8ft. His offence: assisting the Biafran secessionists.

    The Man Died, now regarded as a classic of prison literature, is a product of this experience. What comes through in the compelling narrative is the author's uncompromising, principled stand on the universality and indivisibility of freedom and human rights.

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  • The Poetry of Wole Soyinka By Tanure Ojaide ()
    The Nobel Laureate's reputation as a dramatist tends to cloud his poetic achievement, and in modern African literature, poetry lives in the shadow of fiction. The criticism of Soyinka's poetry has so far centred on his themes of individuality and death, his imagery, and on the controversy over his authenticity, obscurity and difficulty. Here, in a new approach, an academic himself and one of the leading younger generation of African poets, discusses critically the voice and viewpoint of the poet with the object of establishing Soyinka's persona. The book covers the personality and world view of the man, as revealed in his poetry.
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  • YOU MUST SET FORTH AT DAWN: A MEMOIR by Wole Soyinka ()
    Mr. Soyinka, masterfully uses his life as a running commentary for the state of political affairs in Nigeria since 1960. While the book does speak on a lot of serious issues there are many moments of hilarity such as when W.H Auden passes him off as an African Prince and the quest to recover an acient mask that led Mr. Soyinka to Brazil.

    You Must Set Forth at Dawn is a book full of revelations, which in actuality brings into public glare the political animal in Soyinka and the extent to which he was steeped in national politics, which may led some political leaders to see him as meddlesome.  While his dalliance with Biafra earned him a prison term and resulted in his book, The Man Died” he maintained some questionable affinity to General Babangida and loathed General Abacha. Indeed, it was said, that it was Soyinka who gave Gen. Abacha the moniker “deaf and dumb.”

    Mr. Soyinka's style tends to be a little heavy on grammar but overall it is a great book, one that you will love to have bought.
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  • Ake Ni Igba Ewe By Wole Soyinka (HardCover) ()
    This is the yoruba version of Ake: The Years of Childhood.
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  • WS: A Life in Full ()
    A "photo-biography" of Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka
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  • Climate of Fear By Wole Soyinka ()
    In this exceptional book, developed from the 2004 BBC Reith Lectures, Wole Soyinka explores the changing faces of fear; the conflict between power and freedom; the complex motives behind the unthinkable acts of violence; the meaning of human dignity; while comparing the fanaticism of powerful terrorists with the attitude of world leaders, discovering terrifying similarities.
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  • Isara, a voyage around Essay By Wole Soyinka ()
    The contents of a tin box – a handful of letters; old journals with marked pages and annotations; school reports; notebook jottings; tax and other levy receipts; minutes of meetings; and programme notes of special events – which belonged to his father, S. A. (“Essay”) Soyinka, a school teacher during the colonial period in Nigeria, provide the grist for Isara: A Voyage Around Essay, the second instalment of Wole Soyinka's memoirs – a son's fictionalised “voyage” into the life and times of his father.

    A well written account of childhood in pre independence Yorubaland. Although it is probably not typical, it illustrates the essence of the Yoruba parenting style, a style that makes every adult a parent and every child dutiful. I recommend it.

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  • The Forest of a Thousand Daemons By D. O. Fagunwa Translated by Wole Soyinka ()
    This book is a free translation of the Chief D. O. Fagunwa's novel, Ogboju Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale, the most famous of all works of Yoruba fiction. It is the pilgrimage of the Yoruba race and its themes are universal: the quest for lasting happiness and peace of mind and the hazards this entails Wole Soyinka has put this novel at the disposal of a wider reading public by translating it into English. He is a leading national playwright, novelist and poet. His works include Season of Anomy also in this series.
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  • Achebe or Soyinka: A Study in Contrasts By Kole Omotoso ()
    This is a study of Africa's most widely read, and, arguably, her finest writers. Despite their shared nationality and levels of prestige, each represents a distinct pole of Nigerian writing. On the one hand, there is Wole Soyinka, the playful imagist steeped in the myth and magic of his native Yoruba culture; at the other end of the spectrum, Chinua Achebe's internalized Igbo cultural traditions. Kole Omotoso - himself a prolific writer and prize-winning Nigerian novelist - explores and defines the differences in style, background, and vision betweem the two men. Individual chapters describe the childhood and early experiences of each writer, their cultural influences, education, life styles, and political involvement. Omotoso also observes the responses of Nigerian, British and American critics to their output, with a final chapter dedicated to the vision of each writer for Nigeria. An extensive bibliography completes the volume
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  • Harmattan Haze on an African Spring By Wole Soyinka ()
    In this book, Soyinka argues that all claims that Africa has been explored are as premature as news of her imminent demise. A truly illuminating exploration of Africa has yet to take place. It does not pretend to take place even on the pages of this book, being content with retrieving a few grains for germination from the wasteful threshing floor of Africa's existential totality.
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  • In The Forest Of Eledumare Translated By Wole Soyinka ()
    This is the English translated version of one of the great work of Chief D.O. Fagunwa's. Igbo Eledumare, translated by Wole Soyinka.
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  • A Play of Giants By Wole Soyinka ()
    The play, a Play of Giants, was written by Wole Soyinka to present a savage portrait of a group of dictatorial African leaders at bay in an embassy in New York City, United Nations. The play was purposely written to show the resemblance between the recent historical characters/African leaders and long or one time leaders in Africa who were known for their authoritarian or tyrannical rule and these include: Macias Nguema (late) of Equatorial Guinea, Jean Basptiste Bokassa of the Central African Republic, Mobutu Sese Koko of Congo Kinshasa and the Hero of heroes, the Field Marshal El-Haji Dr. Idi Amin of Uganda.

    The play started with three of the dictatorial African leaders, Kamini, Kasco and Gunema who are planning to get a life-size group sculpture of the 'crowned heads' in their likeness. They have the intentions of making their statues part of other statues that would be placed at the UN stair passage. Their discussion on power and governance was interrupted by the presence of the Chairman of the Bugara Central Bank who brought the news of the refusal of the World Bank to grant Bugara country the demanded loan based on the ground of unsatisfied conditions to which the Bugaran President, Life President Dr. Kamini, responded that the Chairman should go back and agree to whatsoever conditions put forward by the World Bank even at the expense of the Bugaran people's body and soul.
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  • Childe Internationale By Wole Soyinka ()
    Childe Internationale By Wole Soyinka
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  • Iku Olokun Esin by Wole Soyinka, Translated by Isola Akinwumi ()
    The title of this book is Iku Olokun-esin and it was written by Wole Soyinka. This particular edition is in a Book format. This books publish date is January 1, 1994. It was published by Fountain Publications and has a total of 105 pages in the book.
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  • Kongi's Harvest: A Play By Wole Soyinka ()
    Kongi's Harvest is a 1965 play written by Wole Soyinka. It premiered in Dakar, Senegal, at the Negro Arts Festival. It was later adapted as a film of the same name, directed by the American Ossie Davis.

    The play was published in 1967 in London and New York by Oxford University Press (Three Crowns Books; 96 pp).

    President Kongi, the dictator of an African developing nation, is trying to modernize after deposing King Oba Danlola, who is being held in detention. Kongi demands that Danlola present him with a ceremonial yam at a state dinner to indicate his abdication. Daodu, Danlola's nephew and heir, grows prized yams on his farm.

    Daodu's lover Segi owns a bar where Daodu spends most of his time. She is revealed to have been Kongi's former lover.

    As the different tribes are resisting unification, Kongi tries to reach his goal by any means necessary, including forcing government officials to wear traditional African outfits and seeking advice from the man he deposed. In a climactic scene at the state dinner, Segi presents Kongi with the head of her father.
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  • The Credo of Being and Nothingness By Wole Soyinka ()
    From the first African Nobel Laureate, this is the first in a series of Olufosoye Annual Lectures on Religions, delivered at the University of Ibadan in 1991. Soyinka, in his characteristically stimulating way, discusses the religions of Nigeria in their national context, and other religions from around the world. The author says "At one conceptual level or the other...deeply embedded as an article of faith, is a relegation of this material world to a mere staging-post...then universal negation...Existence, as we know it, comes to the end that was pre-ordained from the beginning of time. Indeed, time itself comes to anend."
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