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A Matter of Sharing: My Memoir By A.B. Assensoh
A Matter of Sharing is a memoir of Ghana-born A.B. Assensoh, who has lived, studied, and worked in the United Kingdom, Nigeria, and Liberia, where he served in editorial capacities. From Sweden, where he studied at the University of Stockholm and also served as Editor of African Features Service in Scandinavia, he moved to the United States in the mid-1970s, first to serve as a Scholar-in-Residence at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania as well as University of Pennsylvania, and he has lived there ever since. His memoir serves as his recollections of events that bring happiness, mixed feelings and, sometimes, sorrow. Apart from sharing anecdotes of some of the events in West Africa of London, this is the first time that he has committed many of the details.
₦5,000
FEARLESS: THE EMERGENCE OF A VIRILE AND FORMIDABLE OPPOSITION LEADER – THE POLITICAL MEMOIRS OF HON. FEMI GBAJABIAMILA By Wale Okediran
This then is the context that frames the narrative in Fearless:     Fearless is the story of Femi Gbajabiamila, three-term member of the National Assembly representing Surulere 1 Federal Constituency in the National Assembly since 2003 and, since February 2011, the Minority Leader in the House of Representatives. Born 50 years ago on 25 June 1962, our subject is one of select group of emerging leaders with national name recognition born after Independence.  The book is at once a biography and a record of public service that is still unfinished. It is organised in eight parts rendered in 212 pages. Each part is divided into chapters. Comprising six chapters, Part 1 gives an account of the birth of Honourable Gbajabiamila, his early upbringing, schooling and formation in Lagos, his call to the Nigerian Bar after his under-graduate education at the Law Faculty of the University of Lagos and early life as a lawyer ending with his enrollment in the Georgia State Bar in the United States, after acquiring his Juris Doctor  degree from the Marshall Law School in Atlanta.
₦6,000
My Watch – A Memoir by Olusegun Obasanjo (3 Vols)
"During his watch, a watchman has no sleep and no respite."
- Olusegun Obasanjo

Following in the steps of his previous memoirs, My Command and Not My Will, Olusegun Obasanjo's My Watch is more than the story of the Obasanjo presidency told by the man himself. It is a memoir of a lifetime spent in service to country, of a man who has been destined with the watch, with the vigilance, with the responsibility to his people to speak up and speak out.

My Watch spans large expanses of time, from the pre-colonial Owu history, to early Abeokuta and the last throes of an independent city state at turn-of-the-century colonial Nigeria, to the early life of its author, his civil war experience, his stewardship of the transitional government of 1976-1979, the interregnum, his second appearance on the national scene as a civilian president on Nigeria's return to democracy in 1999, the completion of the first civilian-civilian transfer of government in Nigeria's history that inaugurated the Yar'Adua presidency and signalled the end of Obasanjo's tenure in office, and the years hence.

Presented in three volumes, this exquisitely narrated memoir, in turns intensely personal and broadly nationalistic and international, completes a trilogy of autobiographies—My Command, Not My Will, and My Watch—told by this sojourner of Nigerian and world history.
 

Book Info

Publisher: Kachifo Limited under its Prestige Imprint
Year of first release: 2014
Planned release date: November 2014
The book is presented as a three-volume boxset in hardcase and paperback editions. The book is trimmed at 150x235mm, portrait. The page counts are 506, 672, and 400 pages respectively for Volumes 1, 2, and 3. We present a well-designed, illustrated in full colour where relevant, and factual memoir written by the man himself.

Author's Bio

Olusegun Obasanjo, soldier, statesman, author and farmer, born on Ifo Market Day in Ibogun-Olaogun in what was then Abeokuta Province of 1930s colonial Nigeria, joined the Nigerian Army in 1958. He served in the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in the Congo between 1960-1961 and rose to become the General Officer Commanding the 3 Marine Commando Division of the Nigerian Army, which ended the 30-month Nigerian Civil War.

After the war, Obasanjo resumed his duties as the commander of the Nigerian Army Corps of Engineers. He was appointed Federal Commissioner (Minister) for Works in the Gowon Administration, and was appointed Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters—thus becoming the number 2 man in the government hierarchy—after the change of government in 1975.

Obasanjo served as Head of State of the Federal Military Government and Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces from 1976-1979 following the assassination of General Murtala Muhammed in a failed putsch. He handed over to a civilian regime in 1979 and retired to private life of farming. As a statesman he was called upon by the international community, in one instance to serve as co-chair of the Commonwealth Eminent Persons' Group constituted to work on negotiated settlement for the ending of the South African Apartheid policy in 1985. He was also a candidate for the office of Secretary-General of the United Nations in 1991.

Olusegun Obasanjo, a fearless critic of bad government in Africa and particularly in Nigeria, was jailed after the "phantom coup" trial in 1995 by the Abacha Military Regime. He emerged from prison in 1998 and became a candidate for the presidency in the run-up to the military handover to a democratic civilian administration. He won the election and was sworn-in as President of the Federal Republic of Nigerian on May 29 1999.

He stepped down from the presidency in 2007 at the end of his second term and returned to his farm. He still serves the international community in several capacities. He is currently the chief promoter of the Olusegun Obasanjo Presidential Library.

Olusegun Obasanjo has authored several books, significant amongst them, My Command, about his experiences in the Nigerian Civil War; Not My Will, about his service to the nation as Military Head of State; This Animal Called Man, a philosophical reflection on the nature of man written during his time as a political prisoner; and Nzeogwu, about his friend and key figure in the January 1966 coup. This book, My Watch, his latest memoir, promises to join the other books as odes to a life of service to God, humanity and country.

Table of Contents
 
VOLUME 1: My Watch - Early Life and the Military
Introduction
 
Part I: Early Life
1)         Ifo Market Day

  1. The Owus in Yorubaland
  2. The Family
  3. Village Life
  4. From Village to City
  5. The City of Abeokuta
  6. Ibadan- The Oluyole City
 
Part II: Military Career and Administration

  1. Teshie - The Beginning of a Career
  2. From Dream to Reality: Going to the UK
  3. Close to Active Military Operation
  4. Returning Home
  5. Kaduna-The Cosmopolitan City of Crocodiles
  6. The Congo
  7. From Infantry to Corps of Engineers
  8. Assuming Command of Engineers Unit
  9. The Indian Staff College Course
  10. The First Coup And Its Aftermath
  11. Ibadan On Military Assignment
  12. The Nigerian Civil War
  13. The Royal College of Defence Studies
  14. First Step Into Government
  15. The Third Coup
 
Part III: Life After Military Administration

  1. The Inter-regnum
  2. Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group on South Africa
  3. The Race to the 38th Floor
  4. National Unity Organisation of Nigeria (NUON)
  5. My Arrest: The Abacha Saga
  6. The Prison Experience
 
 
VOLUME 2: My Watch - Political and Public Affairs
                                   
Part IV: Second Coming – Politics & Political Affairs

  1. Entry Into Politics
  2. Political Consultations and Convention
  3. Campaigns and the Elections
  4. Planning & Preparation for Governance
  5. Beginning of Governance
  6. Constitution Amendments
  7. The External Dimensions
  8. Atiku and US Justice Entanglement
  9. Succession, Transition and Exit
 
Part V: Second Coming - Governance

  1. Credo and Orientation
  1. Credo
  2. Worship
  3. Death of Stella
  1. Judicial Commission
  1. Investigation of Human Rights Violations – Oputa Panel
  1. Conflict Resolutions
  1. Bakassi
  2. Militancy in the Niger Delta
  3. Internal Conflicts
  4. Regional Conflicts and Relations
  1. Fuel, Energy & Power Reforms
  1. Fuel Shortage
  2. Oil & Gas, Local Content, Marginal Fields
  3. Power & Energy
  1. Economic Reforms
  1. Transportation
  2. Privatisation
  3. Agriculture & Presidential Initiatives
  4. Tourism
  5. Debt Relief
  6. Needs & Vision 2020
  1. Financial Management Reforms
  1. Fighting Corruption
  2. Wage Increase
  3. Monetisation
  4. Contributory Pension Scheme
  5. Recovery of Looted Funds
  6. Price Intelligence Unit
  7. Banking Reform
  1. Social Welfare Services Reforms
  1. National Health Insurance Scheme, NHIS
  2. Polio Immunisation
  3. National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control, NAFDAC
  4. Millennium Development Goals, MDGs
  5. Universal Basic Education, UBE
  6. Housing and Urban Development
  7. Census 2006
  1. Civil Service Reforms
  1. Federal Capital Development Authority, FCDA
  2. Local Government Councils
  3. e-Government
  4. SERVICOM
  1. Administrative Enhancement
  1. Independent Policy Group, IPG
  2. Informal Inner Circle in Governance  (Kitchen Cabinet)
  3. Honorary Presidential Advisory Councils & Other Committees
  4. Executive-Legislative Relations
  5. Visits to States
  6. Improving the National Image
  7. Stated Goals and Proven Performance
 
VOLUME 3: My Watch -Now and Then
 
Part VI: Now and Thereafter

  1. Stand Up and Look
  2. Critical Assessment of Yar’Adua Administration
  3. Special Envoy of UN Secretary-General in DRC and Great Lakes Region
  4. To Be Or Not To Be: Jonathan
  5. The Presidential Library
  6. The Nigeria Centenary
  7. The Media and The Critics
  8. Global Events, Involvement in Note-Worthy Organisations and Leaders
  9. Elections Observations
  10. The Missed, the Missing and the Lost Chances
  11. From Now To...
  12. Epilogue
₦10,000
Educated: A Memoir Hardcover by Tara Westover
Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far if there was still a way home.
₦3,000
Omoluwabi and Esubiyi Of The Yoruba Memoir of Engineer Festus Alfred Oladimeji Oseni
Festus Alfred Oladimeji Oseni was born on January 25, 1934, in Owo, Nigeria. He attended Government College Ibadan and had his tertiary education at University College Ibadan (1954-1956), Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland (1956-1960) and University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, obtaining BSc (Civil Engineering), MS (Civil Engineering) and MPW (Public Works) degrees.

After brief periods with some consulting firms in the UK, he undertook the mandatory practical training in the Civil Engineering Department of Crown Agents London from 1961 to 1963. Thereafter, he returned to Nigeria for his civil service career in the Federal Ministry of Works where he worked on many construction and maintenance projects. He was also at the Planning Department of the Highways Division of the Federal Ministry of Works and took part in the planning, design, and specifications for many road projects in the country.

In 1978 he was transferred to the Federal Capital Development Authority as the first Director of Development and Engineering Services, where he contributed to the definition of the urban transportation system and the regional road network in the Master Plan of the new Federal Capital City, Abuja and the associated activities leading to the eventual construction and first phase of movement to the city.

While his main professional interests are transportation planning, the development of the indigenous construction industry, project management and computer applications, he has made huge contributions to the country's political development through his writings and commentaries. His writings have been delivered at conferences, lectures, and tribunals while some have been published in journals and newspapers. He enjoys sports, current affairs, motoring, flying and traveling.

Engr Oseni voluntarily retired from the Federal Public Service in 1981 to set up an engineering consulting firm, F.A. Oseni Consultancy Services and Oznick Computers Ltd in 1983.

He is a Member, Council of Registered Engineers of Nigeria, Member, Institution of Civil Engineers (London) and Fellow, Nigerian Society of Engineers. In June 2011, he "Achieved the distinction of having been a member of the British Institution of Civil Engineers for fifty years."

He was conferred with the traditional title of Olisa Bobaniyi by Sir Olateru Olagbegi II, KBE, the Olowo of Owo in December 1994.
Engr Festus Alfred Oladimeji Oseni is married with three children: two daughters and a son.
₦3,000
A Mouth Sweeter Than Salt: An African Memoir By Toyin Omoyeni Falola
"Toyin Falola has given us what is truly rare in modern African writing: a seriously funny, racy, irreverent package of memories, and full of the most wonderful pieces of poetry and ordinary information. It is a matter of some interest, that the only other volume A Mouth Sweeter Than Salt reminds one of is Ake, by Wole Soyinka. What is it about these Yorubas?"
-Ama Ata Aidoo

"A splendid coming-of-age story so full of vivid color and emotion, the words seem to dance off the page. But this is not only Falola's memoir; it is an account of a new nation coming into being and the tensions and negotiations that invariably occur between city and country, tradition and modernity, men and women, rich and poor. A truly beautiful book."
-Robin D. G. Kelley

"More than a personal memoir, this book is a rich minihistory of contemporary Nigeria recorded in delicious detail by a perceptive eyewitness who grew up at the crossroads of many cultures."
-Bernth Lindfors

"The reader is irresistibly drawn into Falola's world. The prose is lucid. There is humor. This work is sweet. Period."
-Ngugi wa Thiongo'o


A Mouth Sweeter Than Salt gathers the stories and reflections of the early years of Toyin Falola, the grand historian of Africa and one of the greatest sons of Ibadan, the notable Yoruba city-state in Nigeria.

Redefining the autobiographical genre altogether, Falola miraculously weaves together personal, historical, and communal stories, along with political and cultural developments in the period immediately preceding and following Nigeria's independence, to give us a unique and enduring picture of the Yoruba in the mid-twentieth century. This is truly a literary memoir, told in language rich with proverbs, poetry, song, and humor.

Falola's memoir is far more than the story of one man's childhood experiences; rather, he presents us with the riches of an entire culture and community-its history, traditions, pleasures, mysteries, household arrangements, forms of power, struggles, and transformations.
₦4,000
Last Train to Biafra: Memoir of a Biafran Child by Diliorah Chukwurah
Last Train to Biafra is yet another memoir on the Nigeria-Biafran war. The book however is exceptional in the sense that it ranks among the finest memoirs to be written on the Nigerian-Biafran fratricidal conflict, a must-read for every human being on earth.  In the words of Dr Onyebuchi Ileh, Head, Department of English and Literature, Nigerian Turkish Nile University, Abuja, the book ‘is the most touching account of the pogrom against the Igbos after the 1966 counter coup.’
₦3,000
The Nigeria-Biafra War (1967-1970)-My Memoirs By Patrick A. Anwunah
"As the Biafran Army Commander and therefore, an active participant in the Nigeria-Biafra War, I have written my own account of the war to cover details of tactics and general operational conduct. Colonel (Barrister) Patrick Anwunah, a remarkable Staff Officer both in Nigeria and Biafra, has now through his memoirs, revealed the logistics and general administrative aspects needed to sustain the Biafran Army at war for three years. He has thrown more light on the situation that led to the 'Statement of Peace' by General Philip Efiong to end the war in January 1970."
Out of Stock
₦2,000
Aké: The Years of Childhood: Wole Soyinka’s Memoir
Aké, the first volume of Nigerian Nobel prize winner Wole Soyinka's (possibly slightly fictionalized) autobiography, is the first book of his I've read. For most authors, an autobiography is probably not the best place to start; most of the time, I want a reason to care about what the author has done before getting into his life story.

In this case, though, it doesn't disappoint at all. Aké chronicles young Wole's childhood up to about 11 years of age, and given that he was born in 1934, that's a fairly tumultuous time. While the world war rages somewhere just beyond the horizon, Nigeria is somewhere in between the old ways and the new ones, stuck between old tribal kingdoms and the new world, the old religion and Christianity, the old language and English, still ruled by the British but beginning to find a new identity of its own - which isn't an easy process, as shown by the occasional sobering flash-forward to Nigeria in the early 80s.

Ake tells the story of Wole Soyinka's first eleven years as a child (1934–1945), a period that coincides with major historical events in Nigeria, and around the world – World War II and the famous Women's Uprising in Egbaland, an event in which the author played the role of a courier.

Told, of course, with the benefit of hindsight, the story of Ake is rich, and the wit is bold and blithe. His touching and vivid evocation of the colourful sights, sounds, and aromas of the world that shaped him is lyrical, laced with humour and adorned with the sheer delight of a child's-eye view.

This account contains invaluable and delightful vignettes of some of the individuals and events which were to shape the future political and human rights activist, and Nobel Laureate.

₦4,500
Lest I Forget : Memoirs of a Nigerian Career Diplomat: By OLADAPO OLUSOLA FOWORA
Ironically, the recently released memoirs of Ambassador Oladapo Olusola Fafowora titled Lest I forget: Memoirs of a Nigerian Career Diplomat reflects a degree of forgetfulness and inaccuracy of recollection.
₦6,000
Memoir of Mixed Blessings By Theophilus Oluwole Akindele - HardBack
The memoirs of Theophilus Oluwole Akindele tell the story of a man whose life took many interesting twists and turns to bring him to the pinnacle of the telecommunication industry in Nigeria. …he joined the Colonial Civil Service as a principal telecommunications engineer in charge of the Lagos territory. He rose through the ranks to become Director-General of Communications. Akindele’s account of key events in the political history of Nigeria, being close friends with Ademulegun, Ironsi, and Ogundipe in particular, bring new insights to the turbulent events of the first republic and the subsequent military regimes (Aguyi-Ironsi, Gowon and Murtala Mohammed’s). His role in telecommunication during the civil war gives us fresh insight into important events of that period. Most interesting, however, was the battle of wills that occurred, when he was pitted against Murtala Mohammed, over the signing of the ITT/Radio Corporation of Nigeria contract. This saga eventually cost him his job and could be said to be one of the factors that precipitated the coup of 1976.
₦6,000
YOU MUST SET FORTH AT DAWN: A MEMOIR by Wole Soyinka
Mr. Soyinka, masterfully uses his life as a running commentary for the state of political affairs in Nigeria since 1960. While the book does speak on a lot of serious issues there are many moments of hilarity such as when W.H Auden passes him off as an African Prince and the quest to recover an acient mask that led Mr. Soyinka to Brazil.

You Must Set Forth at Dawn is a book full of revelations, which in actuality brings into public glare the political animal in Soyinka and the extent to which he was steeped in national politics, which may led some political leaders to see him as meddlesome.  While his dalliance with Biafra earned him a prison term and resulted in his book, The Man Died” he maintained some questionable affinity to General Babangida and loathed General Abacha. Indeed, it was said, that it was Soyinka who gave Gen. Abacha the moniker “deaf and dumb.”

Mr. Soyinka's style tends to be a little heavy on grammar but overall it is a great book, one that you will love to have bought.
₦5,000
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