Literature

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A Question of Power By Bessie Head
"Your mother was insane. If you're not careful you'll get insane just like your mother. Your mother was a white woman. They had to lock her up, as she was having a child by the stable boy who was a native." It is never clear to Elizabeth whether the mission school principal's cruel revelation of her origins is at the bottom of her mental breakdown. She has left South Africa with her son and is living in the village of Motabeng, the place of sand, in Botswana where there are no street lights at night. In the darkness of this country where people turn and look at her with vague curiosity as an outsider she establishes an entirely abnormal relationship with two men. A mind-bending book which takes the reader in and out of sanity.
₦1,600
Season of Migration to the North By Salih
The Sudanese writer al-Tayyib Salih has been described as the "genius of the modern Arabic novel." He has lived abroad for most of his life, yet his fiction is firmly rooted in the village in which he spent his early years. His most well-known work is the modern classic Mawsim al-hijra ila’l-shamal (1967; Season of Migration to the North), which received great critical attention and brought new vitality to the Arab novel.

Salih has not been a prolific writer; his early work, including Season of Migration to the North, remains the best of his oeuvre. He has received critical acclaim in both the west and the east. In Sudan he is without rival, and his writing has played a considerable part in drawing attention to Sudanese literature. Arabic literature has been dominated by social criticism, social realism, and committed literature depicting the bitter realities of life; Salih managed to break with this trend and return to the roots of his culture, capturing the mystery, magic, humor, sorrows, and celebrations of rural life and popular religion.

₦1,600
Girls at war and other stories By Chinua Achebe
Girls at war and other stories
The madman.--The voter.--Marriage is a private affair.--Akucke.--Chike's school days.--The sacriticial egg.--Vengeful creditor.--Dead men's path.--Uncle Ben's choice.--Civil peace.--Sugar baby.--Girls at war.
Author: Chinua Achebe
Copyright date: August 1, 1991
Out of Stock
₦1,500
Half of a Yellow Sun By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
An epic story of love and civil war set in Nigeria during the 1960s, Half of a Yellow Sun recounts the lives of three characters caught up in events larger than themselves. Ugwu, a young houseboy working for an idealistic university professor. Olanna, the professor's mistress, and Richard, a British expatriate in love with Olanna's twin sister, Kainene. Their relationships are thrown into jeopardy when Richard spends one drunken night with Olanna, and as the war escalates. 


With Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie firmly establishes herself as a most powerful storyteller and humanist, ''the 21st-century daughter of Chinua Achebe,'' according to The Washington Post Book World. 

The book has won numerous awards and accolades worldwide, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction in 2007.


 

About the Author:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria. Her work has been translated into thirty languages. From the award-winning author, comes a new work 'Amaericanah' a powerful story of love, race and identity.Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, published by Algonquin in 2003, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Broadband Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her story collection, The Thing Around Your Neck, was the winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. A recipient of a 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

₦2,500
Mandela's Earth and Other Poems By Wole Soyinka
This was Soyinka's first collection of poems after winning the Noble prize in literature in 1986 and it is like a political collection as well as a poetic work.
₦1,200
Achebe or Soyinka: A Study in Contrasts By Kole Omotoso
This is a study of Africa's most widely read, and, arguably, her finest writers. Despite their shared nationality and levels of prestige, each represents a distinct pole of Nigerian writing. On the one hand, there is Wole Soyinka, the playful imagist steeped in the myth and magic of his native Yoruba culture; at the other end of the spectrum, Chinua Achebe's internalized Igbo cultural traditions. Kole Omotoso - himself a prolific writer and prize-winning Nigerian novelist - explores and defines the differences in style, background, and vision betweem the two men. Individual chapters describe the childhood and early experiences of each writer, their cultural influences, education, life styles, and political involvement. Omotoso also observes the responses of Nigerian, British and American critics to their output, with a final chapter dedicated to the vision of each writer for Nigeria. An extensive bibliography completes the volume
₦3,500
The Lion and the Jewel By Wole Soyinka
The Lion and the Jewel is a play by Wole Soyinka first performed in 1959. It chronicles how Baroka, the lion, fights with the modern Lakunle over the right to marry Sidi, the titular Jewel. Lakunle is portrayed as the civilized antithesis of Baroka and unilaterally attempts to modernize his community and change its social conventions for no reason other than the fact that he can. The transcript of the play was first published in 1962 by Oxford University Press. Soyinka emphasises the theme of the corrupted African culture through the play as well as how the youth should embrace the original African culture.
₦1,000
Sizwe Banzi Is Dead By Athol Fugard.
"There is no mention of the theory of apartheid.....but you experience with unique vividness what it is like to have a black skin and live in South Africa; you taste the flavour of life. This is possibly the greatest service that the theatre can render"
-Sunday Times
₦1,200
African Proverbs I - III Box Set
This Volume consists of African Proverbs I, II, and III
₦4,500
ALAPATA APATA: A Play for Yorubafonia, Class for Xenophiles By Wole Soyinka
After an exceptionally successful career as a butcher; Alaba, the protagonist of this play decided that he deserves a life of quite retirement. Unfortunately beneath the rock on which he has chosen to make his abode are precious mineral deposits. Soon, both Alaba and the rock become a place of more than passing interest to everyone – from the lowly, to denizens of power: The outcome of this rollicking drama is more than anyone, least of all, Alaba himself, bargained for:

Wole Soyinka’s latest play, is a powerful satire of the idiosyncrasies and excesses of our contemporary Nigeria society; the corruption of power; opportunism and cultural alienation.
₦2,000
The Secret Lives of Baba Segi's Wives
For a polygamist like Baba Segi, his collection of wives and a gaggle of children are the symbol of prosperity, success and validation of his manhood. Everything runs reasonably smoothly in the patriarchal home, until wife number four intrudes on this family romance.

Bolanle, a graduate amongst the semi-literate wives, is hated from the start. Baba Segi's glee at bagging a graduate doesn't help matters. Worse, Bolanle's arrival threatens to do more than simply ruffle feathers. She's unwittingly set to expose a secret that her co-wives intend to protect, at all costs.

Lola Shoneyin's light and ironic touch exposes not only the rotten innards of Baba Segi's polygamous household in this cleverly plotted story; it also shows how women no educated or semi-literate, women in contemporary Nigeria can be as restricted, controlled and damaged by men - be they fathers, husbands, uncles, rapists - as they've never been.
₦2,500
Americanah By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Americanah is a fearless novel set in Nigeria, England and America. It boldly takes on issues both big and small: love, race, home, hair, Obama, immigration, and self-invention. In the early 1990s, under Abacha’s government, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. People are leaving the country if they can and Ifemelu leaves for America, where alongside defeats and triumphs, she confronts the inevitable question of race. Obinze, unable to join her in America, goes on to live as an illegal immigrant in London. After several years they have both achieved success — Ifemelu as a popular blogger about race, and Obinze as a wealthy man in the now democratic Nigeria. When Ifemelu decides to return to Nigeria, she and Obinze must both make the biggest decision of their lives.


About the Author:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria. Her work has been translated into thirty languages. From the award-winning author, comes a new work 'Amaericanah' a powerful story of love, race and identity.Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, published by Algonquin in 2003, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Broadband Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her story collection, The Thing Around Your Neck, was the winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. A recipient of a 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

₦2,000
Equiano's travels Edited By Paul Edwards
Widely admired for its vivid accounts of the slave trade, Olaudah Equiano's autobiography -- the first slave narrative to attract a significant readership -- reveals many aspects of the eighteenth-century Western world through the experiences of one individual. The second edition reproduces the original London printing, supervised by Equiano in 1789. Robert J. Allison's introduction, which places Equiano's narrative in the context of the Atlantic slave trade, has been revised and updated to reflect the heated controversy surrounding Equiano's birthplace, as well as the latest scholarship on Atlantic history and the history of slavery. Improved pedagogical features include contemporary illustrations with expanded captions and a map showing Equiano's travels in greater detail. Helpful footnotes provide guidance throughout the eighteenth-century text, and a chronology and an up-to-date bibliography aid students in their study of this thought-provoking narrative.
₦1,600
Everything Good Will Come By Sefi Atta

It is 1971, and Nigeria is under military rule, though the politics of the state matter less than those of her home to Enitan Taiwo, an eleven-year-old girl tired of waiting for school to start. Will her mother, who has become deeply religious since the death of Enitan’s brother, allow her friendship with the new girl next door Sheri Bakare? This novel charts the fate of these two Nigerian girls, one who is prepared to manipulate the traditional system and one who attempts to defy it.

THE REVIEWS

“A beautifully paced stroll in the shoes of a woman growing up in a country struggling to find its post-independence identity…Everything Good Will Come depicts the struggles women face in a conservative society. This is convincing; more remarkable is what the novel has to say about the need to speak out when all around is falling apart.” – Times Literary Supplement, UK

“An original, witty, coming-of-age tale: Tom Sawyer meets Jane Eyre, with Nigerian girls…you can feel the dust and sun. This is award-winning novel is an iridescent introduction to a fascinating nation.” – Observer Magazine, UK

“Again and again Atta’s writings tugs at the heart, at the conscience. At the same time, reflecting the resilience of the Lagosians whose lives she explores, humour is almost constant, effervescent, most often with a satirical twist.” – Sunday Independent, South Africa

“This lively first novel breaks new ground with a close-up, honest story of a contemporary Yoruba woman’s coming-of-age in Lagos. Never reverential, Enitan’s first person narrative reveals the dynamic diversity within the city, the differences across class, generation, gender, faith, language, tradition, and individual character. Differences, yes, but sometimes connections, too.” – Booklist

“Sefi Atta’s first novel has the nerve to redefine existing traditions of African Story telling. It confronts the familiar passions of a city and a country with unusual insights and a lyrical power pointing our literature to truly greater heights.” – Odia Ofeimun, author of The Poet Lied

“Everything Good Will Come is like listening to an old friend recounting and bringing up to date and to life happenings in our beloved city of Lagos. I was sorry when I came to the end.” – Buchi Emecheta, author of The Joys of Motherhood

“What is beyond doubt is that Sefi writes brilliantly with instantly infectious wit.” – Bashorun JK Randle, author of The Godfather Never Sleeps

“There is wit, intelligence and a delicious irreverence in this book. But it is Sefi Atta’s courage in choosing to look at her fictional world through fiercely feminist lenses that I most admired.” – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of Purple Hibiscus

“This is a courageous story about friendship and self-discovery, it is a rallying cry to women to speak out in a world that tries to muzzle them.” – Helon Habila, author of Waiting For an Angel

“An affirmation of faith in one’s capacity, especially female and national, for self-realization.” – Tanure Ojaide, author of Labyrinths of the Delta

₦4,500
The Trouble Wth Nigeria By Chinua Achebe
The eminent African novelist and critic, here addresses Nigeria's problems, aiming to challenge the resignation of Nigerians and inspire them to reject old habits which inhibit Nigeria from becoming a modern and attractive country. In this famous book now reprinted, he professes that the only trouble with Nigeria is the failure of leadership, because with good leaders Nigeria could resolve its inherent problems such as tribalism; lack of patriotism; social injustice and the cult of mediocrity; indiscipline; and corruption
Out of Stock
₦1,500
The Deceptive Silence of Stolen Voices By Wole Soyinka
Nigeria as a country is bedevilled by myriads of paradoxes. These unite to dwarf its stature and hence there have been popular calls for a National Conference. Yet the powers-that-be oppose its convening with overt recalcitrance prompting Soyinka at Emeka Anyaoku's 70'" Birthday to articulate his position once again and ask "Will the National Conference open up a Pandora's Box?"
₦600
Kongi's Harvest: A Play By Wole Soyinka
Kongi's Harvest is a 1965 play written by Wole Soyinka. It premiered in Dakar, Senegal, at the Negro Arts Festival. It was later adapted as a film of the same name, directed by the American Ossie Davis.

The play was published in 1967 in London and New York by Oxford University Press (Three Crowns Books; 96 pp).

President Kongi, the dictator of an African developing nation, is trying to modernize after deposing King Oba Danlola, who is being held in detention. Kongi demands that Danlola present him with a ceremonial yam at a state dinner to indicate his abdication. Daodu, Danlola's nephew and heir, grows prized yams on his farm.

Daodu's lover Segi owns a bar where Daodu spends most of his time. She is revealed to have been Kongi's former lover.

As the different tribes are resisting unification, Kongi tries to reach his goal by any means necessary, including forcing government officials to wear traditional African outfits and seeking advice from the man he deposed. In a climactic scene at the state dinner, Segi presents Kongi with the head of her father.
₦600
A Play of Giants By Wole Soyinka
The play, a Play of Giants, was written by Wole Soyinka to present a savage portrait of a group of dictatorial African leaders at bay in an embassy in New York City, United Nations. The play was purposely written to show the resemblance between the recent historical characters/African leaders and long or one time leaders in Africa who were known for their authoritarian or tyrannical rule and these include: Macias Nguema (late) of Equatorial Guinea, Jean Basptiste Bokassa of the Central African Republic, Mobutu Sese Koko of Congo Kinshasa and the Hero of heroes, the Field Marshal El-Haji Dr. Idi Amin of Uganda.

The play started with three of the dictatorial African leaders, Kamini, Kasco and Gunema who are planning to get a life-size group sculpture of the 'crowned heads' in their likeness. They have the intentions of making their statues part of other statues that would be placed at the UN stair passage. Their discussion on power and governance was interrupted by the presence of the Chairman of the Bugara Central Bank who brought the news of the refusal of the World Bank to grant Bugara country the demanded loan based on the ground of unsatisfied conditions to which the Bugaran President, Life President Dr. Kamini, responded that the Chairman should go back and agree to whatsoever conditions put forward by the World Bank even at the expense of the Bugaran people's body and soul.
₦600
The Strong Breed By Wole Soyinka
The Strong Breed is one of the best known plays by Wole Soyinka. It is a tragedy that ends with an individual sacrifice for the sake of the communal benefit. The play is centered on the tradition of egungun, a Yoruba festival tradition in which a scapegoat of the village carries out the evil of the community and is exiled from the civilization. Eman, the play's protagonist, takes on the role of "carrier", knowing it will result in beating and exile. He does this to spare a young simpleton the same fate. The ritual takes an unexpected turn as Eman flees. His pursuers set a trap for him that results in his death.
₦600
Death and the King's Horseman By Wole Soyinka
Death and the King's Horseman is a play by Wole Soyinka based on a real incident that took place in Nigeria during British colonial rule: the ritual suicide of the horseman of an important chief was prevented by the intervention of the colonial authorities. In addition to the British intervention, Soyinka calls the horseman's own conviction toward suicide into question, posing a problem that throws off the community's balance.
Out of Stock
₦700
Poems Of Black Africa By Wole Soyinka
Poems of Black Africa is a poetry anthology edited by Wole Soyinka, and published in 1975 (see 1975 in poetry) as part of the Heinemann African Writers Series. It was arranged by theme.
Out of Stock
₦1,500
The Credo of Being and Nothingness By Wole Soyinka
From the first African Nobel Laureate, this is the first in a series of Olufosoye Annual Lectures on Religions, delivered at the University of Ibadan in 1991. Soyinka, in his characteristically stimulating way, discusses the religions of Nigeria in their national context, and other religions from around the world. The author says "At one conceptual level or the other...deeply embedded as an article of faith, is a relegation of this material world to a mere staging-post...then universal negation...Existence, as we know it, comes to the end that was pre-ordained from the beginning of time. Indeed, time itself comes to anend."
Out of Stock
₦600
The Man Died: Prison Notes of Wole Soyinka By Wole Soyinka
A savage, stabbing inquiry, not into human nature proper, but into human nature viewed through the concave mirrors of solitary confinement and human evil, stretched and warped into horrible familiarity. Soyinka is hard to read, if you read him straight -- this book is most effective when you enter into its twisting, doubling corridors and let Soyinka transform your mind and introspection into a prison of your own. Like most great books, this one works on several levels: an indictment of political injustice, a pyschological study of the prisoner, and (pardon the cliche) a metaphor for the human condition. Brilliant and haunting.

During the Nigerian Civil War (1967–1970) Wole Soyinka was arrested and incarcerated for twenty-two months, most of it spent in solitary confinement in a cell, 4ft by 8ft. His offence: assisting the Biafran secessionists.

The Man Died, now regarded as a classic of prison literature, is a product of this experience. What comes through in the compelling narrative is the author's uncompromising, principled stand on the universality and indivisibility of freedom and human rights.

₦4,500
Daughters Who Walk This Path By Yejide Kilanko
Spirited and intelligent, Morayo grows up surrounded by school friends and family in Ibadan. There is Eniayo, her adoring little sister—for whose sake their middle-class parents fight stigmatising superstition—and a large extended family of cousins and aunts who sometimes make Morayo’s home their own. A shameful secret forced upon her by Bros T, her cousin, thrusts Morayo into a web of oppressive silence woven by the adults around her. Morayo must learn to fiercely protect herself and her sister as young women growing up in a complex and politically charged country.
₦3,500
The Jero Plays By Wole Soyinka
The Jero Plays by Wole Soyinka consist of two short plays re-released as a collection in 1973. The Trials of Brother Jero first came out in 1964, while Jero’s Metamorphosis was published two years later in 1966. Both plays satirize Christianity and religious hypocrisy, particularly, the unquestioning devotion that many converts display towards their spiritual leaders, often exposing themselves to manipulation in the process.

As the title suggests, The Trials of Brother Jero is about a charlatan preacher, Brother Jero.  Brother Jero is a cunning beach diviner who woos customers (penitents) to his church by using Christian superstition for his own salvation. For him, the church is a business. He says:

 ‘I am glad I got here before any customers-I mean worshipers..  l always get a feeling every morning that am a shopkeeper waiting for customers.’

Brother Jero is suave while his followers are gullible. He lures people to his church by promising them material gains and promotions through prayer. Chume his assistant often seeks for permission to beat his arrogant wife Amope but Brother Jero disagrees:

‘ I keep my followers dissatisfied because if they are satisfied, they won’t come again..’

₦600
God's Bits of Wood By Ousmane Sembène
In 1947-48 the workers on the Dakar-Niger railway staged a strike. In this vivid, timeless novel, Ousmane Sembène envinces the color, passion, and tragedy of those formative years in the history of West Africa.
₦1,600
House of Symbols by Akachi Adimora Ezeigbo
Very few writers can give life and essence to their work as Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo does in this remarkable novel where the deep voice of tradition and the significant breath of the 'rememberer' blend in a notable symphony which fills the reader up to the brim.

House Of Symbols is a remarkable achievement in plot, style, characterization, atmosphere and every other thing that goes into a powerful novel. It is the story of the sensitive Osai as well as his Eaglewoman into whose bag 'money flows like the Otaru River.' Terror mingles with humor, pain with pleasure in this fascinating saga set in a town in Eastern Nigeria.

This is a profoundly written book, a work of immense significance which fills an aching vacuum in African Literature
                            -The Lumina 

 Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo is Professor and head of the department of English at the University of Lagos, Nigeria. She is a prolific writer, with over 50 publications, including 14 books and numerous journal articles. She has won at lea4A four major creative writing prizes, including ANA Prizes for Prose Fiction and Women Writing, and WORDOC Short Stone Competition. She was a visiting Commonwealth Fellow at SOAS, the University of London in 1989/90 and a Research Fella' at University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa in 1999/2000.
₦1,500
There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra By Chinua Achebe
In the aftermath of the release of Chinua Achebe's book titled There Was a
Country: A Personal History of Biafra and his article published in the Guardian
on 2 October 2012, there have been many debates about the Biafra war.
Some have accused Achebe of stirring up old wounds by resurrecting the "B"
question, while others are appalled at his comment about Awolowo’s policies,
which Achebe claims resulted in the starvation of millions of people. Some
have suggested that rather than heap the blame on Nigerian officials, Achebe
should have heaped the blame on the Biafran leaders who embarked on a
war knowing that their army was ill equipped to take on the Nigerian forces.
The debate has also taken a tribal dimension with many Igbo’s rallying behind
Professor Achebe, while many Yoruba’s have taken to the opposite side by
expressing their displeasure at Achebe, while defending Awolowo’s legacy.
Regardless of what Achebe said or did not say, it does not deny the fact that
his article in the Guardian and his new book are timely. For a very long time,
the Biafra question keeps on coming up again and again. On one hand, the
Igbo's feel aggrieved by what they experienced during the war, while on the
other hand, the rest of the country feel that the Biafra war occurred long ago
and that the Igbo's should get over it and move on.
Unfortunately, the current debate triggered by Achebe’s article and book has
resulted in many of us focusing on the principal players in the war, rather than
focusing on the underlying issue at hand: i.e. the genocide that took place
during the three year war. One problem with focusing on the principal actors
such as Yakubu Gowon, Obafemi Awolowo, Chinua Achebe, Emeka Ojukwu,
Olusegun Obasanjo, Brigadier Adekunle, Murtala Mohammed etc is that none
of these actors were significantly impacted by the war. They and most of their
family all came out of the war, intact, healthy and alive. However, what we
need to revisit as a nation is the tragic story of the millions of people (majority
children) who died as a result of man’s cruelty to man.
THIS IS REALLY A MUST GET BOOK!
₦3,000
African Short Stories By Chinua Achebe
This anthology of 20 stories are from all over Africa, grouped geographically into four different sections - West, East, North and Southern Africa.
₦1,600
Purple Hibiscus By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
Purple Hibiscus is the story of Kambili, a self-effacing, teenage girl coming of age in Eastern Nigeria. Living in too-sheltered privilege, and at once in awe and fear of her fanatic, violent father, Kambili's world starts to fall apart after she and her brother are sent from home to briefly visit an aunt and their cousins. There, they learn about love and laughter, and so return to their strict, silent home forever changed...


Internationally-acclaimed winner of The Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Best First Book in 2005, Purple Hibiscus marked the debut of an astonishing literary talent. Purple Hibiscus is now on the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) list for Literature.
 

About the Author:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria. Her work has been translated into thirty languages. From the award-winning author, comes a new work 'Amaericanah' a powerful story of love, race and identity.Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, published by Algonquin in 2003, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Broadband Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her story collection, The Thing Around Your Neck, was the winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. A recipient of a 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

₦1,000
Early Achebe By Bernth Lindfors
Early Achebe deals with the essays, stories, and groundbreaking novels Chinua Achebe published between 1951 and 1966 during the first phase of the writer s long and distinguished literary career. Lindfors, a longstanding and renowned scholar and critic of African literature, demonstrates vividly the pervasive influence the subject s early writing had not only on fellow Nigerian authors but also on teachers and critics of African literature both on the continent and abroad. The book concludes with a previously unpublished lecture by Achebe titled The Writer and the African Revolution delivered at The University of Texas at Austin in November 1969, followed by Achebe s responses to questions he was asked by students, faculty, and townspeople at the time. Bernth Lindfors the major sleuth of African literature has struck gold again. The goldmine reveals a decidedly comic Achebe in his early work, segueing to his more serious writing, the result of the tragedy of Biafra. Few writers want to see their earliest scribbling brought back into full light or photos from long ago reproduced. Credit must go to both Chinua Achebe and Bernth Lindfors for resuscitating these important materials. Charles R. Larson, Author of The Emergence of African Fiction and The Ordeal of the African Writer If anybody else outside Africa has been helpful in making to use Chinua Achebe's words about Ulli Beier Africans to see themselves through the freshness of their own vision, it is Bernth Lindfors. With its fondness for the excavating detail, the vernacular elegance of its style, and the unremitting respect and admiration for his subject's integrity as a writer, Early Achebe both enfolds and simulates Achebe's reciprocal pedagogy in all its stylistic and global width. Raoul J. Granqvist, Professor Emeritus of English Literature, Umeå University, Sweden A coherent critical groundwork and an important contribution to African literary history, Lindfors s Early Achebe is a unique starting-point for a deeper understanding of the cultural contexts, esthetic roots, thematic commitments, and stylistic features of not only Achebe s fiction but also his poetry and essays. Chukwuma Azuonye, Professor of African Literature, University of Massachusetts, Boston As one of the pioneers of African literature criticism and editor of the monumental bibliographical series Black African Literature in English, Bernth Lindfors has made contributions to African literature that are always exciting and full of relevance. His latest book, Early Achebe, which contains Chinua Achebe's earliest writings going back to his undergraduate days at University College, Ibadan, and Lindfors's own earliest essays on Achebe, is a gift of love to students and teachers of Achebe's works, and a necessary addition to the ever-growing body of commentaries in the field of Achebe studies. ... Early Achebe is, thus, an important and opportune work; it could not have been issued a moment too soon. Emmanuel Obiechina Associate Fellow, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University, and Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters
₦8,000
Madmen and Specialists By Wole Soyinka
Madmen and Specialists is a play by Wole Soyinka, conceived in 1970 during his imprisonment in the Nigerian Civil War. The play, Soyinka's eighth, has close links to the Theatre of the Absurd. Abiola Irele (in the Lagos Sunday Times) called it "a nightmarish image of our collective life as it appears to a detached and reflective consciousness". It was published in London 1971 by Methuen and in New York in 1972 by Hill & Wang.

Madmen and Specialists is considered Soyinka's most pessimistic play, dealing with "man's inhumanity and pervasive corruption in structures of power". The plot concerns Dr. Bero, a corrupt specialist, who imprisons and torments his physician father.

'Wole Soyinka's Nobel Prize for Literature is a triumphant affirmation of the universality of this novelist, poet, film-maker and political activist.' - Guardian
₦2,950
The Education of a British-Protected Child By Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe’s characteristically eloquent and nuanced voice is everywhere present in these seventeen beautifully written pieces. From a vivid portrait of growing up in colonial Nigeria to considerations on the African-American Diaspora, from a glimpse into his extraordinary family life and his thoughts on the potent symbolism of President Obama’s elections—this charmingly personal, intellectually disciplined, and steadfastly wise collection is an indispensable addition to the remarkable Achebe oeuvre.
₦5,950
King BaaBu By Wole Soyinka
A naked satire on the rule of General Abacha in Nigeria, the play chronicles the debauched rule of General Basha Bash who takes power in a coup and exchanges his general's uniform for a robe and crown re-christening himself King Baabu. In the manner of Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi, Soyinka develops a special childish language for his cast of characters who have names like Potipoo and General Uzi. Weaving together burlesque comedy, theatrical excess, and storytelling, King Baabu has already been coined as a pet name for the despot par excellence. 'We turn Guatu into kingdom, ruled by kings. Nobody complains anymore. General Basha Bash is dead. Long Live King Baabu.'
₦2,950
Home and Exile By Chinua Achebe
“A rare opportunity to glimpse a bit of the man behind the monumental novels.” —Chicago Tribune

Powerful and deeply personal, these three essays by the great Nigerian author articulate his mission to rescue African culture from the narratives written by Europeans. Looking through the prism of his experiences as a student in English schools in Nigeria, he recalls his first encounters with European perspectives on Africa in the works of Joyce Cary and Elspeth Huxley. He examines the impact that his novel Things Fall Apartas well as fellow Nigerian Amos Tutola’s The Palm-Wine Drinkard and Jomo Kenyatta’s Facing Mt. Kenya, among other workshad on efforts to reclaim Africa’s story. He confronts the persistence of colonial views of Africa. And he argues for the importance of living and writing the African experience: Africa needs stories told by Africans.
₦3,500
The interpreters By Wole Soyinka
The interpreters, written by Wole Soyinka in 1965, divided into two parts, is a social realism which major theme centres on the post-independence moral decadence that plagues the Nigerian society, up-till date, attempted to be solved by the Nigerians who had just returned from studies abroad. Each of the main characters is engaged in the enterprise of interpreting himself in relation to the society in which he lives, in an attempt to discover the right way to live. The narrative is, as a result, multi-stranded and employs a shifting, subjective time-scale, and in some aspects, the narrative situation used is figural, sometimes resulting in flashbacks; rendered with an intense use of language somewhat complex and metaphorical. The novel has its settings in Lagos and University of Ibadan. There is a range of character types in The Interpreters in that each of the main personae has an individual way of interpreting the world, though of course, due to their association with each other, there is a degree of commonality in some respects, both in the sense of shared experience and of quality of experience as intellectuals, though with some exceptions. However, their interpretations tilted towards the same thought stemming from shared experiences as intellectuals, except Kola. They bear the burden of the author’s worries and emphasis on indecision. They collectively and helplessly search for self-identity as a way out of the identity crisis and lack of moral stance.
₦1,500
Arrow of God By Chinua Achebe
Set in the Ibo heartland of eastern Nigeria, one of Africa's best-known writers describes the conflict between old and new in its most poignant aspect: the personal struggle between father and son.
₦1,600
Sugar Girl By Kola Onadipe
Ralia is missing from home under mysterious and unfortunate circumstances. Therefore, sh goes through ordeals, one after the other: First in the hands of a wicked witch and then a hunter.

Will she survive these ordeals and return home...... and under what circumstances?

₦600
YOU MUST SET FORTH AT DAWN: A MEMOIR by Wole Soyinka
Mr. Soyinka, masterfully uses his life as a running commentary for the state of political affairs in Nigeria since 1960. While the book does speak on a lot of serious issues there are many moments of hilarity such as when W.H Auden passes him off as an African Prince and the quest to recover an acient mask that led Mr. Soyinka to Brazil.

You Must Set Forth at Dawn is a book full of revelations, which in actuality brings into public glare the political animal in Soyinka and the extent to which he was steeped in national politics, which may led some political leaders to see him as meddlesome.  While his dalliance with Biafra earned him a prison term and resulted in his book, The Man Died” he maintained some questionable affinity to General Babangida and loathed General Abacha. Indeed, it was said, that it was Soyinka who gave Gen. Abacha the moniker “deaf and dumb.”

Mr. Soyinka's style tends to be a little heavy on grammar but overall it is a great book, one that you will love to have bought.
₦4,500
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