Literature

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City of Memories by Richard Ali
City of Memories, a debut novel by Richard Ali, follows Faruk Ibrahim, his father, his lover and her mother as they negotiate peculiar Nigerian traumas. Towering above them is the story of Ummi al-Qassim, a princess of Bolewa, and the feud, madness and death that attend her first love affairs. All four are bracketed by the modern city of Jos in central Nigeria, where political supremacy and perverse parental love become motives for ethno-religious crisis designed to destroy the Nigerian State.
₦3,000
Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir by Ngugi wa Thiong'o
Wrestling with the Devil is Ngugi’s unforgettable account of the drama and challenges of living under twenty-four-hour surveillance. He captures not only the pain caused by his isolation from his family, but also the spirit of defiance and the imaginative endeavours that allowed him to survive.
₦4,000
Buried Beneath the Baobab Tree by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani
Based on interviews with young women who were kidnapped by Boko Haram, this poignant novel by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani tells the timely story of one girl who was taken from her home in Nigeria and her harrowing fight for survival.
₦4,000
Nanna's Diary by Richard Mammah
The massive naval assault on his headquarters at Ebrohimi was enough to dampen the faint-hearted. But that was not for Nanna. He fought back gamely, chose his time to exit, and voluntarily submitted himself to justice in Lagos and Calabar.

When he could not get that, he endured exile in Ghana but would yet not give up the fight until he was finally able to return to his beloved Niger Delta.

Nanna’s Diary is a fictional peep into the workings of his mind while it all lasted.

Underscoring the fact that the author is engaged in an unambiguous journey of pan-African expression, the text glides across time and space to encompass other major historical episodes of the era; such as those involving Jaja of Opobo, Ovonramwen Nogbaisi of Benin and Yaa Asantewaa of the Ashanti Empire in today’s Ghana. It is a book that surely makes good reading.
₦2,000
The House My Father Built by Adewale Maja-Pearce
In this memoir, about a house his father built, Adewale Maja-Pearce captures the essence of the last decade of the 20th Century. He paints, in the minutest of detail, the sense of transition, of inevitable change, of frustration at its slow pace. The reader, while focused on the small details, is coerced to lean back, and take in the big picture.
₦3,500
The Beginning of Everything Colourful by Onyeka Nwelue
Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko are welcoming Spain's King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia, who are visiting Japan as state guests, at the Imperial Palace, with Crown Prince Naruhito and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe also attending a related event there. But there are two nameless people who are not happy with this visit - a Mexican musician, who hates the Spanish and a Japanese business man, who hates the Chinese. They meet at the Transit Lounge in Doha International Airport, waiting for their connecting flight to Tokyo and begin telling revealing stories, which take us to Lille, Paris, New York, New Delhi, Lagos, Tel Aviv and down to Tokyo.
₦3,500
MIRIAM: From Grass to Grace by Olusegun Isaac
Miriam is a transformation account. It is the story of the refinement of a plain village girl from raw to high quality, from crude to top grade purity. Her latent potential in the worship of God was discovered early by a dedicated and gifted missionary who proceeded to mould the ordinary lump of clay into a refined piece of vessel most fit for the use of the Master, an icon to her generation.
₦2,000
Blackass by A. Igoni Barrett
Furo Wariboko – born and bred in Lagos – wakes up on the morning of his job interview to discover he has turned into a white man. As he hits the city streets running, still reeling from his new-found condition, Furo finds the dead ends of his life open out before him. As a white man in Nigeria, the world is seemingly his oyster – except for one thing: despite his radical transformation, Furo's ass remains robustly black . . .

Funny, fierce, inventive and daringly provocative – this is a very modern satire, with a sting in the tail.
 
₦3,500
The Mechanics of Yenagoa by Michael Afenfia
Ebinimi, star mechanic of Kalakala Street, is a man with a hapless knack for getting in and out of trouble. Some of his troubles are self-inflicted: like his recurring entanglements in love triangles; and his unauthorised joyriding of a customer’s car which sets off a chain of dire events involving drugs, crooked politicians, and assassins. Other troubles are caused by the panorama of characters in his life, like: his sister and her dysfunctional domestic situation; the three other mechanics he employs; and the money-loving preacher who has all but taken over his home.
The story is fast-paced with surprising twists and a captivating plot - a Dickenesque page-turner. This is Ebinimi’s story but it is about a lot more than him. It is an exploration of the dynamics between working-class people as they undertake a colourful tour of Yenagoa, one of Nigeria’s lesser-known cities, while using humour, sex, and music, as coping mechanisms for the everyday struggle.
It is a modern-classic tale of small lives navigating a big city.
₦4,000
A Broken People's Playlist by Chimeka Garricks
A Broken People’s Playlist is a collection of short stories with underlying themes so beautifully woven that each story flows into the other seamlessly. From its poignant beginning in “Lost Stars” a story about love and it’s fleeting, transient nature to the gritty, raw musical prose encapsulated in “In The City”, a tale of survival set in the alleyways of the waterside. A Broken People’s Playlist is a mosaic of stories about living, loving and hurting through very familiar sounds, in very familiar ways and finding healing in the most unlikely places.

The stories are also part-homage and part-love letter to Port Harcourt (the city which most of them are set in). The prose is distinctive as it is concise and unapologetically Nigerian. And because the collection is infused with the magic of evocative storytelling, everyone is promised a story, a character, to move or haunt them.
₦4,000
The Voyage of Saints by Marvin Abe
Michael Ajose was convinced by an unforgettable dream that his life’s course could only be charted by a mysterious woman’s love. So, he decided to find her, and marry her. He was 12 years old.

This is the story of how he found her – Lami. How he loved her – like an addiction. And how she loved him – like an anchor for his soul. Painted in cinematic recollections and a part-epistolary style, this is the story of their love – starting from the pre-military era of Nigeria’s history, spanning governments, and continents. And as they struggle to steer their ship through life’s dangerous waters and against all forces determined to keep them apart, this is the story of their fate.
₦6,000
The Danfo Driver in All of Us and Other Essays by Niran Adedokun
The Danfo Driver in all of us and other essays is a compilation of Niran Adedokun’s personal reflections and interventions on a variety of topical national issues in the space of five years between 2013 and 2018 Although a few the articles were published in some other newspapers, most of the articles in this collection were published in The PUNCH and thecable.ng where Adedokun is a weekly columnist. His largely non-partisan pieces advocate for responsible and responsible governance as well as a dutiful and alert citizen. He argues that these are two non-negotiable characteristics of a progressive society and that unless everyone wakes up to their responsibility Nigeria will remain a dream.
₦4,000
Wake Me When I'm Gone by Odafe Atogun
Everyone says that Ese is the most beautiful woman in the region, but a fool. A young widow, she lives in a village, where the crops grow tall and the people are ruled over by a Chief on a white horse. She married for love, but now her husband is dead, leaving her with nothing but a market stall and a young son to feed.When the Chief knocks on Ese's door demanding that she marry again, as the laws of the land dictate she must, Ese is a fool once more. There is a high price for breaking the law, and an even greater cost for breaking the heart of a Chief. Ese will face the wrath of gods and men in the fight to preserve her heart, to keep her son and to right centuries of wrongs. She will change the lives of many on the road to freedom, and she will face the greatest pain a mother ever can.'Wake Me When I'm Gone' is a story of curses broken, and lives remade, of great tragedy and incredible rebirth. In this, his second novel, Nigerian writer Odafe Atogun unfolds a world rich with tradition and folklore, a world filled with incredible people of remarkable strength, a world that is changing fast.
₦3,000
AVIARA: Who Will Remember You by Othuke Ominiabohs

When twenty-five-year-old Anthony Mukoro returns from the city, to his hometown Aviara, it is with news that shatters the hopes of his retired parents – he is dying. This startling revelation sends his family into a frantic search for answers. But the answers they seek will come at a cost.

To save his life, he must confront forgotten memories from a traumatic experience in his past and a darkness that swells and grows unnoticed within the town. Unknown to Anthony, this begins a journey that will lead him into a dark world of murder and a town’s history steep in blood and shadows.

Aviara explores the complex balance between science and spirituality, fate and ancestry, within the labyrinth of one man’s unravelling reality.

₦4,000
My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite
When Korede's dinner is interrupted one night by a distress call from her sister, Ayoola, she knows what's expected of her: bleach, rubber gloves, nerves of steel and a strong stomach. This'll be the third boyfriend Ayoola's dispatched in, quote, self-defence and the third mess that her lethal little sibling has left Korede to clear away. She should probably go to the police for the good of the menfolk of Nigeria, but she loves her sister and, as they say, family always comes first. Until, that is, Ayoola starts dating the doctor where Korede works as a nurse. Korede's long been in love with him, and isn't prepared to see him wind up with a knife in his back: but to save one would mean sacrificing the other...
₦3,500
The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi
One afternoon, in a town in southeastern Nigeria, a mother opens her front door to discover her son’s body, wrapped in colorful fabric, at her feet. What follows is the tumultuous, heart-wrenching story of one family’s struggle to understand a child whose spirit is both gentle and mysterious. Raised by a distant father and an understanding but overprotective mother, Vivek suffers disorienting blackouts, moments of disconnection between self and surroundings. As adolescence gives way to adulthood, Vivek finds solace in friendships with the warm, boisterous daughters of the Nigerwives, foreign-born women married to Nigerian men. But Vivek’s closest bond is with Osita, the worldly, high-spirited cousin whose teasing confidence masks a guarded private life. As their relationship deepens—and Osita struggles to understand Vivek’s escalating crisis—the mystery gives way to a heart-stopping act of violence in a moment of exhilarating freedom.

Propulsively readable, teeming with unforgettable characters, The Death of Vivek Oji is a novel of family and friendship that challenges expectations—a dramatic story of loss and transcendence that will move every reader.
 
₦5,500
Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi
An extraordinary debut novel, Freshwater explores the surreal experience of having a fractured self. It centers around a young Nigerian woman, Ada, who develops separate selves within her as a result of being born "with one foot on the other side." Unsettling, heartwrenching, dark, and powerful, Freshwater is a sharp evocation of a rare way of experiencing the world, one that illuminates how we all construct our identities.

Ada begins her life in the south of Nigeria as a troubled baby and a source of deep concern to her family. Her parents, Saul and Saachi, successfully prayed her into existence, but as she grows into a volatile and splintered child, it becomes clear that something went terribly awry. When Ada comes of age and moves to America for college, the group of selves within her grows in power and agency. A traumatic assault leads to a crystallization of her alternate selves: Asụghara and Saint Vincent. As Ada fades into the background of her own mind and these selves--now protective, now hedonistic--move into control, Ada's life spirals in a dark and dangerous direction.

Narrated by the various selves within Ada and based in the author's realities, Freshwater dazzles with ferocious energy and serpentine grace, heralding the arrival of a fierce new literary voice.
₦3,700
Ruth Halima by Oladisun Delano

RuthHalima is a story of love, a love that endures times, a love that survives contrary tides, a love that demonstrates faith and a love that unites faiths. It is also a story of innocence and experience of heartbreaks and healing, of family and forgiveness. The author holds nothing back in this free-flowing prose that aptly captures the beauty and timelessness of love.

₦3,000
Men Don't Die by Ever Obi
In the possession of stolen lucre, Brume Lauva takes a big step and decides to run away from a life he has known for more than a decade; a life of consistent failures, and from a girlfriend that shattered his heart and his last feeble grip on a broken dream. Lagos, he believes, could offer another chance at life, where he could mend his broken heart, and perhaps start to dream again. But en route to his land of promise, a fatal bus crash occurs, and Brume is the only survivor—without a scratch. He flees the scene of the accident and hitchhikes his way to Lagos.
₦4,000
A Pelican of the Wilderness by Jacqueline Uche Agweh
At the turn of the century in Nigeria's Niger Delta, gangs and secret cults in the guise of militants hijack the struggle for equity in the exploitation of the country's oil wealth. Tonpre, suave privileged son of a judge finds himself inexplorably drawn into the clutches of such a gang. In the beginning, he relishes his new role, blind to lingering questions on the morality of the deeds of his cult brothers. Tragedy will force him to query his and their motives, and pull all concerned into a deathly grip of intrigue, murder and heartbreak. In her latest novel, Jacqueline U. Agweh wields the powers of a Amsterdam of the thriller genre to bring to her reader a satisfying story of her country's struggle with inequality.
₦2,500
Love Is Power, or Something Like That: Stories by A. Igoni Barrett
When it comes to love, things are not always what they seem. In contemporary Lagos, a young boy may pose as a woman online, and a maid may be suspected of sleeping with her employer and yet still become a young wife’s confidante. Men and women can be objects of fantasy, the subject of beery soliloquies. They can be trophies or status symbols. Or they can be overwhelming in their need.

In these wide-ranging stories, A. Igoni Barrett roams the streets with people from all stations of life. A man with acute halitosis navigates the chaos of the Lagos bus system. A minor policeman, full of the authority and corruption of his uniform, beats his wife. A family’s fortunes fall from love and wealth to infidelity and poverty as poor choices unfurl over three generations. With humor and tenderness, Barrett introduces us to an utterly modern Nigeria, where desire is a means to an end, and love is a power as real as money.
₦3,000
International Sisi Eko and Other Stories by Hope Eghagha, Karen King-Aribisala
A desperate doctor commits murder to appease his wife. A drug-dealing family comes undone following a police raid. A young foreign-educated graduate, brimming with patriotic zest, returns to Nigeria to help rebuild her country, but quickly becomes disillusioned as the hassle and unpredictability of Lagos overwhelm her. And in jaunty, pointed observations, “Two-Way Streets” collects and reflects on the motifs of typical Lagos living.

The stories in this anthology take on the beautiful, clustered Lagos with aplomb and all-knowing authority, the characters’ lives coming together to weave a rich tapestry of a city that is at once startling in its grime and entertaining in its glory.
₦2,000
Every Day is for the Thief by Teju Cole

A young man decides to visit Nigeria after years of absence.  Ahead lies the difficult journey back to the family house and all its memories; meetings with childhood friends and above all, facing up to the paradox of Nigeria, whose present is as burdened by the past as it is facing a new future.

Along the way, our narrator encounters life in Lagos. He is captivated by a woman reading on a danfo; attempts to check his email are frustrated by Yahoo boys; he is charmingly duped buying fuel.  He admires the grace of an aunty, bereaved by armed robbers and is inspired by the new malls and cultural venues.  The question is: should he stay or should he leave?

But before the story can even begin, he has to queue for his visa…

Every Day is for the Thief is a striking portrait of Nigeria in change.  Through a series of cinematic portraits of everyday life in Lagos, Teju Cole provides a fresh approach to the returnee experience.

₦1,600
Born on a Tuesday by Elnathan John
From two-time Caine Prize finalist Elnathan John, a dynamic young voice from Nigeria, Born on a Tuesday is a stirring, starkly rendered first novel about a young boy struggling to find his place in a society that is fracturing along religious and political lines.

In far northwestern Nigeria, Dantala lives among a gang of street boys who sleep under a kuka tree. During the election, the boys are paid by the Small Party to cause trouble. When their attempt to burn down the opposition’s local headquarters ends in disaster, Dantala must run for his life, leaving his best friend behind. He makes his way to a mosque that provides him with food, shelter, and guidance. With his quick aptitude and modest nature, Dantala becomes a favored apprentice to the mosque’s sheikh. Before long, he is faced with a terrible conflict of loyalties, as one of the sheikh’s closest advisors begins to raise his own radical movement. When bloodshed erupts in the city around him, Dantala must decide what kind of Muslim—and what kind of man—he wants to be. Told in Dantala’s naïve, searching voice, this astonishing debut explores the ways in which young men are seduced by religious fundamentalism and violence.
₦5,000
The Chibok Girls: The Boko Haram Kidnappings & Islamic Militancy in Nigeria by Helon Habila

An urgent Penguin Special investigating the 2014 mass-kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls by the world's deadliest terrorists

On 14th April 2014, 276 girls disappeared from a secondary school in northern Nigeria, kidnapped by the world's deadliest terror group. A tiny number have escaped back to their families but many remain missing.

Reporting from inside the traumatised and blockaded community of Chibok, Helon Habila tracks down the survivors and the bereaved. Two years after the attack, he bears witness to their stories and to their grief. And moving from the personal to the political, he presents a comprehensive indictment of Boko Haram, tracing the circumstances of their ascent and the terrible fallout of their ongoing presence in Nigeria.

₦4,000
Woman at Point Zero by Nawal El Saadawi, Sherif Hetata (Translator)
From her prison cell, Firdaus, sentenced to die for having killed a pimp in a Cairo street, tells of her life from village childhood to city prostitute. Society's retribution for her act of defiance - death - she welcomes as the only way she can finally be free.
₦3,500
Fine Boys by Eghosa Imasuen
In his second novel, Eghosa Imasuen presents the everyday life of a Nigerian university student against the backdrop of the pro-democracy riots of the 1980s and ‘90s, the lost hopes of June 12th, and the terror of the Abacha years.
₦2,700
The Bottom of Another Tale by Su'eddie Vershima Agema
Fun, humour, the extraordinary and everything beautiful! The Bottom of another Tale is a collection of 26 captivating short stories that capture different aspects to contemporary African life in simple but beautiful language that would leave a lasting impression on readers. ...a rare blend of legends and maxims... Engaging, the tales are short, crisp and pregnant, with diverse messages. -Tubal Rabbi Cain, multiple award winning poet
₦1,800
And After Many Days by Jowhor Ile
An unforgettable debut novel about a boy who goes missing, a family that is torn apart, and a nation on the brink.
₦3,000
26a by Diana Evans
A hauntingly beautiful, wickedly funny, and devastatingly moving novel of innocence and dreams that announces the arrival of a major new talent to the literary scene

In the attic room at 26 Waifer Avenue, identical twins Georgia and Bessi Hunter share nectarines and forge their identities, while escaping from the sadness and danger that inhabit the floors below. But innocence lasts for only so long--and dreams, no matter how vivid and powerful, cannot slow the relentless incursion of the real world.
₦3,500
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