Nigeria Civil War

Equip your Library with over 50 titles of about The Nigeria Civil War at whooping 10% discount.
USE DISCOUNT CODE "NCW10​" AT CHECK OUT

(Minimum order of N40,000)


WARNING!:  The Discount Code Expire by
Sort By:  
Everything Good Will Come By Sefi Atta

It is 1971, and Nigeria is under military rule, though the politics of the state matter less than those of her home to Enitan Taiwo, an eleven-year-old girl tired of waiting for school to start. Will her mother, who has become deeply religious since the death of Enitan’s brother, allow her friendship with the new girl next door Sheri Bakare? This novel charts the fate of these two Nigerian girls, one who is prepared to manipulate the traditional system and one who attempts to defy it.

THEREVIEWS

“A beautifully paced stroll in the shoes of a woman growing up in a country struggling to find its post-independence identity…Everything Good Will Come depicts the struggles women face in a conservative society. This is convincing; more remarkable is what the novel has to say about the need to speak out when all around is falling apart.” – Times Literary Supplement, UK

“An original, witty, coming-of-age tale: Tom Sawyer meets Jane Eyre, with Nigerian girls…you can feel the dust and sun. This is award-winning novel is an iridescent introduction to a fascinating nation.” – Observer Magazine, UK

“Again and again Atta’s writings tugs at the heart, at the conscience. At the same time, reflecting the resilience of the Lagosians whose lives she explores, humour is almost constant, effervescent, most often with a satirical twist.” – Sunday Independent, South Africa

“This lively first novel breaks new ground with a close-up, honest story of a contemporary Yoruba woman’s coming-of-age in Lagos. Never reverential, Enitan’s first person narrative reveals the dynamic diversity within the city, the differences across class, generation, gender, faith, language, tradition, and individual character. Differences, yes, but sometimes connections, too.” – Booklist

“Sefi Atta’s first novel has the nerve to redefine existing traditions of African Story telling. It confronts the familiar passions of a city and a country with unusual insights and a lyrical power pointing our literature to truly greater heights.” – Odia Ofeimun, author of The Poet Lied

“Everything Good Will Come is like listening to an old friend recounting and bringing up to date and to life happenings in our beloved city of Lagos. I was sorry when I came to the end.” – Buchi Emecheta, author of The Joys of Motherhood

“What is beyond doubt is that Sefi writes brilliantly with instantly infectious wit.” – Bashorun JK Randle, author of The Godfather Never Sleeps

“There is wit, intelligence and a delicious irreverence in this book. But it is Sefi Atta’s courage in choosing to look at her fictional world through fiercely feminist lenses that I most admired.” – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of Purple Hibiscus

“This is a courageous story about friendship and self-discovery, it is a rallying cry to women to speak out in a world that tries to muzzle them.” – Helon Habila, author of Waiting For an Angel

“An affirmation of faith in one’s capacity, especially female and national, for self-realization.” – Tanure Ojaide, author of Labyrinths of the Delta

₦4,500
THE NIGERIAN CIVIL WAR: FORTY YEARS AFTER WHAT LESSONS By Armstrong Matiu Adejo
Seven years after independence, Nigeria was plunged into a tumultuous political crisis that degenerated into a major civil war, which lasted for thirty months. The war ended in 1970 with great casualties on both sides, especially from the Igbo. The Nigerian government, under General Yakubu Gowon military administration, declared that there was “no victor and no vanquished”. The Federal Military Government went further to implement the famous post war reconstruction programme christened the three Rs: that is Reconstruction, Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. How constructive this programme was still remains the subject of intense debate amongst scholars. Indeed, forty years after the war, thee fundamental issues that caused the war continue to be topical in the politics of the country.

Themes:
In the light of the above, the Historical Society of Nigeria is organizing an international conference on the Nigerian Civil War Forty Years After: What Lessons? The following sub-themes are expected to be considered by interested scholars:

a. Issues and causes of the Nigerian Civil War
b. The course of the Nigerian Civil War
c. Igbo perspective on the Nigerian Civil War
d. Non-Igbo perspective on the Nigerian Civil War
e. Ethnic minorities and the Nigerian Civil War
f. The war economy and its consequences
g. Demobilization and disarmament
h. Refugee Problem and the Nigerian Civil War
i. Post-civil war generation and their perspectives on the Nigerian Civil War
j. Literature on the Nigerian Civil War
k. Nigerian women and the Civil War
l. Resurrection of the Nigerian Civil War/irredentist ideas and movements
m. The Nigerian Civil War and the Wider World

Out of Stock
₦4,000
We Are All Biafrans -A Participant Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster By Chido Onumah
We Are All Biafrans is a collection of essays focusing on the crisis of nationhood in Nigeria.

In this book, Chido Onumah argues that many, if not all, of the problems of Nigeria are rooted in the structure of the country. He makes a case, as he did in his previous books, for the socio-political restructuring of Nigeria. He argues that the country needs to engage episodic political convulsions that threaten its very foundation, including Biafra, June 12, Boko Haram, the “National Question”, citizenship rights, and “militocracy”.


₦5,500
The Forest Dames By AdaOkere Agbasimalo
The Forest Dames is a novel based on war experiences that must be told in order to free the mind, disseminate information and prick the conscience of war agitators. It is a true life story fictionaised to reduce impact.

The book tells the story of a young girl who lived with her parents in the relatively calm and peaceful British colony of Nigeria, where shortly after independence compatriots went for each other’s throats. This soon exploded into a full blown civil war and from that time onwards, nothing was ever the same again.

The war came with ugly incidences, one of which was the hunt for and abduction of girls and women to be forcibly converted to bed mates. Families sought hiding places for their ‘eligible’ females but these hide-outs were soon discovered through the power of and intimidation from the gun. Two women however decided that their daughters will never be made victims. They found a ‘safe haven’ for their daughters – the evil forest where the roars of wild animals were continually heard. But this is nothing compared to the brutal termination of lives and wanton destruction of properties through air, land and marine attacks; including starvation that was the order of the day, and which placed the final death mark on the people.

The forest dames, four in number, survived the war and one of them decides to tell the unfortunate story of the elasticity of human suffering. All four dames are still alive and can be reached for further interactions. One of the brave mothers is also still living.

About the Author
AdaOkere Agbasimalo writes with a passion that underscores her connection with her environment and profound knowledge of the theme of her work. She also has a rare gift in creative writing which enables her to latch on to a theme and very quickly weave her way through the scenes and characters with masterly control. This skill is perceptible in all her works which are unputdownable as they all immediately draw the reader into the story with a commitment to fulfill the objective of the story. Not afraid to grapple with potent social issues in her works, AdaOkere Agbasimalo in her usual candour, set out in the book "The Forest Dames", to recount war experiences from the gender perspective. With typical incisive narrative and imagery, she paints an engaging picture of hate, fear, passion, hunger, deprivation and hope, all the key elements of the crisis of war; eliciting in the reader, profound empathy at all turns. Her thoughts as enunciated in her book "The Forest Dames" should catalyze any mind desirous of equity, justice, fairness and peace in the world, to embrace these virtues. "Mom, you are rare" - Chibueze Benjamin Agbasimalo (son), Student, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State Nigeria. 2004. "Ndaa Ada Agbasimalo, i nwere ezi aha n'ulo di gi, i nwere ezi aha n'ebe i na aru oru, i nwere ezi aha n'umu nna gi". - Chima Eke alias Obareze (Bongo Musician) 2008 in album title Ezi aha ka ego
₦3,500
JP CLARK - A VOYAGE By Femi Osofisan (Hardback)

The definitive biography of “the main animating force of African poetry” 

JP Clark: A Voyage is the definitive biography of Clark by Femi Osofisan, himself one of Nigeria’s most accomplished playwrights. It chronicles the life and career of the man John Pepper Clark – Bekederemo, from his remarkable childhood to his emergence in the 60s among the best and brightest of Nigerian literature. For the first time, JP breaks his silence about the controversial position he took during Nigeria’s Civil War and discusses his relationship with Soyinka and Achebe.

Generally regarded as the most lyrical of the poets of his generation for his simple, down to earth, visual and descriptive imagery, which makes his poems among the most memorable, JP Clark is perhaps the most underrated of Nigeria’s literary giants: Achebe, Soyinka and Okigbo, being the others.

₦6,000
The Nigeria-Biafra War (1967-1970)-My Memoirs By Patrick A. Anwunah
"As the Biafran Army Commander and therefore, an active participant in the Nigeria-Biafra War, I have written my own account of the war to cover details of tactics and general operational conduct. Colonel (Barrister) Patrick Anwunah, a remarkable Staff Officer both in Nigeria and Biafra, has now through his memoirs, revealed the logistics and general administrative aspects needed to sustain the Biafran Army at war for three years. He has thrown more light on the situation that led to the 'Statement of Peace' by General Philip Efiong to end the war in January 1970."
Out of Stock
₦2,000
The Militant writes Back By Nengi Josef Ilagha

Epistle to Maduabebe is Nengi Josef Ilagha's ninth book in nine years. Its publication on December 18, 2009, virtually brought the author's home state of Bayelsa to a standstill. Trenchant and uncompromising in all twelve chapters, brimming with prophecy for a world gone sour, the book has been hailed as “the height of polemic iconoclasm in Nigeria.”

Its author is the militant poet, journalist, and broadcaster who served time in the government of Bayelsa State as a Speech Writer. Its subject is corruption and greed. Its hope is redemption for a nation that is fast losing its dreams. Its righteous tirade is trained at Dr. Edmund Maduabebe Daukoru, former OPEC President, two-time Minister of Petroleum in Nigeria, and paramount ruler of Nembe, a key oil-producing community in the south of the country, and godfather of the incumbent government under Chief Timipre Sylva-Sam.

₦3,500
The Military and the Nigerian State, 1966-1993: A Study of the Strategies of Political Power Control by Adegboyega Isaac Ajay
The Military and the Nigerian State establishes the circumstances of military incursion into Nigerian politics and examines the civil war and how it enhanced the military s control of political power. It highlights and analyses the strategies which the military rulers consciously employed to monopolize political power in Nigeria between 1966 and 1993. It concludes that: the deliberate corrective regime posturing; the politics of patronage and subordination; the employment of coercive and repressive methods; militarization and guided transition programmes were used (with varying degrees of success) by different military regimes to prolong their hold on political power.
Out of Stock
₦3,000
Emeka By Frederick Forsyth
Biafran war. Anioma, the Igbo homeland west of the River Niger, was for long absent in the accounts on the civil war; yet, the Anioma like their Igbo kith and kin east of the River Niger (who led the Biafran revolution and fought the Nigerian federal government from 1967 to 1970) were as involved militarily and otherwise as Biafrans in the confrontation with the federal government all through that period of crisis. In analyzing Anioma women war-time roles, the book draws largely on interviews with women who survived the war, some of whom were adults during the crisis and others who were children at the time.
₦1,000
Surviving Biafra: A Nigeria Wife's Story By S. Elizabeth Bird
In 1961, Rosina 'Rose' Martin married John Umelo, a young Nigerian she met on a London Tube station platform, eventually moving to Nigeria with him and their children. As Rose taught Classics in Enugu, they found themselves caught up in Nigeria's Civil War, which followed the 1967 secession of Eastern Nigeria--now named Biafra. The family fled to John's ancestral village, then moved from place to place as the war closed in. When it ended in 1970, up to 2 million had died, most from starvation. Rose ('worse off than some, better off than many') had kept notes, capturing the reality of living in Biafra--from excitement in the beginning to despair towards the end.

Immediately after the war, Rose turned her notes into a narrative that described the ingenious ways Biafrans made do, still hoping for victory while their territory shrank and children starved by the thousand. Now anthropologist S. Elizabeth Bird contextualizes Rose's story, providing background on the progress of the war and international reaction to it. Edited and annotated, Rose's vivid account of life as a Biafran 'Nigerwife' offers a fresh, new look at hope and survival through a brutal war.
₦10,000
A carnage before dawn: Based on Nigeria First Coup Detat by Ayomide Akinbode
The prime minister and the finance minister have just been abducted and their whereabouts are unknown. The premieres the northern and western regions have been murdered with some senior military officers of the army.
There has been a coup, a mutiny, and carnage by a group of junior officers. the first time in the nation. however, the general officer commanding the rebellion which eventually marked the end of the republic.
The events of January 15, 1966, marked a turning point in the history of Nigeria and will forever go down as one of the nation's most defining moments.
₦3,000
Ojukwu: The Last Patriot By Valentine Obienyem
The dust generated by Emeka’s administrative work had hardly settled down when, in search of an organization that would escape his father’s influence, he generated another controversy that threatened to separate him from his father for good. He joined the Army! This was in 1957, when the Nigerian Army was merely a part of an all-embracing British West African army called the Royal West African Frontier Forces (RWAFF). These forces included the armies of Nigeria, Gold Coast (now Ghana), Sierra-Leone and Gambia.
₦5,000
In Biafra Africa Died By Emefiena Ezeani
The is a most comprehensive and scholarly research narrative on the Nigeria-Biafra War, which has been described by some academics as “the worst crime against humanity since World War II.”
₦3,000
The Making of an African Legend: The Biafra Story By Frederick Forsyth
This is the book which marked Frederick Forsyth's transition from journalist to author. A record of one of the most brutal conflicts the Third World has ever suffered, it has become a classic of modern war reporting. But it is more than that. It voices one man's outrage not only at the extremes of human violence, but also at the duplicity and self-interest of the Western Governments - most notably, the British, who tacitly accepted or actively aided that violence.
₦2,500
House of War By Dare Babarinsa
House of War is a chronicle of the bitter and bloody struggle for political power in Nigeria’s Second Republic, especially among the followers of the late sage Chief Obafemi Awolowo. This is the story about the schism in the Awo camp and how Awoists turned against one another in the great scramble for political office. The book exposes the politicians’ grand auction of principles and the political intrigues, double dealings, back stabbings, stealing of votes, arson and killings, that characterised the Second Republic, especially during the 1983 elections. It is a relevant book, especially for those who have been following Nigeria’s new attempt to establish a worthwhile democracy since the end of military rule in 1999.

About the Author
Dare Babarinsa, a leading Nigerian journalist, graduated from the University of Lagos in 1981; he was the Chief Correspondent of the Concord Group of Newspapers in Ondo State during the 1983 general elections. He was Associate Editor at the leading Nigerian news magazine News watch until 1990 when he joined four other journalists from the News watch stable to establish Tell, Nigeria’s acclaimed foremost weekly news magazine.
₦3,500
JUST BEFORE DAWN: By Kole Omotosho
incidents in the book are real; the narrative is conceived and written as a novel. The story covers riots, uprisings, private hopes and griefs and coup d'etats -a history marred by violence, with an outcome satisfactory to none. The book was received as a major contribution to African writing, in its innovative style, and was awarded Special Commendation in the Noma Award for Publishing in Africa in 1989, which described it as providing a more profound understanding than is available in conventional history books and novels.
₦2,500
Nigeria/Biafra Civil War : My Experience By Achike Udenwa

Coming barely seven years after Nigeria’s independence, the civil war is, perhaps, the most critical watershed in the country’s annals. Heaps of books have written on that seemingly spontaneous event, but 41 years after the bombs stopped landing and rifles stopped crackling, the last of the war of survival has not been heard.

It has become the proverbial elephant whose different body parts were felt by seven blind men and each had a different story to tell. The latest of the wartime stories comes from a high-profile participant. Chief Achike Udenwa two-term governor of Imo State and former Minister of Commerce has also thrown his hat in the ring in the matter of reliving his own side of war time tales.

If, indeed, there had been any doubts about Chief Udenwa’s claims to being a central participant in the 30-month conflict then his new book captioned Nigerian/Biafran Civil War:My Experince has cleared such doubts permanently.

The 258-page book, structured in seven chapters, excluding preliminaries, strikes at the heart of an event which significance continues to reverberate in the face of current political developments.

In reality, it cannot be said with exactitude that Nigeria has finally overcome threats to its unity; a threat amplified by current security situations such as gave birth, though in varied circumstance, to the war which Udenwa partook in as a very young man.

In the first 76 pages the author took a historical perspective of Nigeria’s political evolution, making copious references to immediate events that eventually culminated in the civil war.

₦4,000
Sunset at Dawn A Novel of the Biafran War By Chukwuemeka Ike
As one of Nigeria's top writers, the author is concerned with the condition of his country. In this novel he tells, with humour, a human story set in the tragedy of the Biafran war. Fatima is fleeing the enemy planes with her young son, and through her unfolding drama, the reader sees what the war was really like through Biafran eyes.
₦2,500
The Man Died: Prison Notes of Wole Soyinka By Wole Soyinka
A savage, stabbing inquiry, not into human nature proper, but into human nature viewed through the concave mirrors of solitary confinement and human evil, stretched and warped into horrible familiarity. Soyinka is hard to read, if you read him straight -- this book is most effective when you enter into its twisting, doubling corridors and let Soyinka transform your mind and introspection into a prison of your own. Like most great books, this one works on several levels: an indictment of political injustice, a pyschological study of the prisoner, and (pardon the cliche) a metaphor for the human condition. Brilliant and haunting.

During the Nigerian Civil War (1967–1970) Wole Soyinka was arrested and incarcerated for twenty-two months, most of it spent in solitary confinement in a cell, 4ft by 8ft. His offence: assisting the Biafran secessionists.

The Man Died, now regarded as a classic of prison literature, is a product of this experience. What comes through in the compelling narrative is the author's uncompromising, principled stand on the universality and indivisibility of freedom and human rights.

₦4,500
Reflections on the Nigerian Civil War: Facing the Future By Raph Uwechue
A comment on the First Edition from Lagos' Sunday Times: "The most unimpassioned account, to date, of the Nigerian civil War...Reflections is a book for any shelf..."
₦3,500
The Nigerian Civil War and Its Aftermath by Eghosae E. Osaghae, Ebere Onwuduwe, Rotimi T. Suberu
The Nigerian civil war ended in January 1970. Yet it continues to be the point of reference in political discourses in the country, in part because the attempts to meet the challenges created by the war have themselves created a whole range of new problems and malcontents. These have become the defining elements of the post-war era, and underlie the tensions that have characterized Nigerian politics. The civil war may, therefore, be the turning point in Nigeria's development trajectory that scholars and analysts seem not to have acknowledged. Or it might be that the war is in urgent need of re-interpretation and further interrogation in view of such post-war developments as threats of secession, demands for confederation, and the claim that resource control was at the root of the conflicts that degenerated into civil war.

Whichever it is, however, it is clear that the war has important implications and lessons for the viability and consolidation of democracy in Nigeria, both now and the future. Contributors to this volume examine these implications and lessons from different perspectives.
₦4,500
Under Three Masters: Memoirs Of An African Administrator by Jerome Udoji
Under Three Masters is an elegant, moment by moment narration of the eventual life and career of a Nigerian Administrative officer who had the unique experience of serving under the colonial, civilian, and military regimes.
As the first African district officer, the author went down memory lane to give an in-depth account of his outstanding stewardship, the problems connected with the transfer of power as well as those inherent in the exercise of power by Nigeria'sevolving political adventure, he proffers his type of political arrangement which he feels is ideal for Nigeria.
the book which also dwells on the author's varied experiences in both the private sector and international service is compulsory reading for historians, politicians, government officials, administrators, students of administrative, company executives as well as prospective Nigerian and expatriate investors.
₦3,000
My Command: An Account of the Nigerian Civil War 1969-70
When former President Olusegun Obasanjo penned his war memoirs, he called it My Command, a cocky title since no one expected anything less than command for a general's account of his soldiery during the Nigerian Civil War. Again whose command should it have been? Could he have woven the war tales of another general? Readers would have called him presumptuous. Yet, when his fellow combatants read his story, they called him presumptuous. They implied that the earthy man lied through his pen, the man who ran this country twice, once as civilian and the other as soldier, who claimed victory for the war, who affects the air of the soldier as statesman, who even tinkers with the toga of thinker, was not the soldier he claimed. To his credit though, Obasanjo might have claimed to be a soldier but not a gentleman. Get a copy and read on
₦4,000
Hubris: A Brief Political History of the Nigerian Army by Akintunde A. Akinwumi

The Nigerian Army is an institution that has played a pivotal role in the affairs of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. For more than half of the 57 years since Independence, Nigeria was directly ruled by a Military Government, largely composed of army officers, and always headed by one. It is impossible to explore any facet of modern Nigerian history or society without the military (and in particular the Army) looming significantly. Whilst several authors have documented the history of Nigeria (and significantly less many of its Army), rarely, if ever, has the impact of the politics of Nigeria on the Army, and vice-versa, formed the exclusive subject of study. This volume is an endeavor to fill that gap.

The period leading up to the Army’s first overt entry into the politics of Nigeria is reviewed, firstly the pre-Independence period, and then the years immediately following independence. The effects of the Nigerianisation of the Army, especially of the officer corps, and of the policy decisions made following the passing of control over the Army from the British to the Nigerian Government are considered. The political circumstances surrounding the Army’s first overt entry into politics - the January 1966 coup - and the political performance of the subsequent first military regime are discussed, as a precursor to the second coup in July 1966.

The impact of the Army’s direct involvement in politics on the military performance of both sides in the Civil War is explored. After a nine-year interregnum, in July 1975 Nigeria returned to the era of coups, with at least eight attempted and successful coups, some of them bloody, over the next quarter century before the return to civilian rule in 1999. The personalities leading the resultant military Governments, and the policies of those Governments, are explored, in an attempt to discern their legacy on the political development of Nigeria, and on the Nigerian Army as an institution.

₦7,000
The Ifeajuna Manuscript By Demola Adeniran

Major Emmanuel IFEAJUNA, the first-ever black African to win a gold medal at a major international sports event and Nigeria’s first-ever gold medalist was more famous for his lead role in the January 15th, 1966 violent coup in Nigeria than for his track and field acclamation of the 1956 commonwealth in Vancouver.

In 1967, he wrote a controversial account of January 15th, 1966 coup in an unpublished manuscript popularly called The Ifeajuna Manuscript; which mysteriously went missing in the hands of some of Nigeria’s best literary minds.

About the same time Major Ifeajuna wrote his manuscript, a British freelance war correspondent, Dan Witszel came to Nigeria with a bequeathed hand made diary to cover the war from the Biafran front. What Witszel didn’t realize was that his ordinary-looking diary had within it, secrets of the most sophisticated oil rig ever designed!

Forty-odd years on, a renowned Nigerian writer, ignited the interest of very powerful individuals in the international oil business when he described Dan Witszel’s diary as the material with which Major Ifeajuna wrote his manuscript. With this new revelation, a clandestine search for the manuscript was then sanctioned by powerful oil executives in London and they sent a ruthless ex SAS man, Robyn Callahan to look for the manuscript at all costs even if it meant murder.

Out of Stock
₦3,000
Our Fathers’ Land : Including Reminiscences On The Nigerian Civil War By Titus Okereke
Titus Okereke treats us to a world worth living in his book, Our Fathers’ Land – Including Reminiscences on the Nigerian Civil War. This is the first book of its class, an autobiographic tale well told, to come out of an alumnus of the old University College, Ibadan, from a graduate of the early sixties, 1960-1964.
₦4,000
VICTOR BANJO: AN UNTOLD ACCOUNT OF THE NIGERIAN CIVIL WAR By Deji Yesufu
Victor Banjo: An Untold Account of the Nigerian Civil War concentrates on Victor Banjo between 1966 and 1967 when he died. The first issue is Victor Banjo’s role in the January 1966 coup. Yesufu completely exonerates Victor Banjo of any role in the January 1966 coup. Yesufu tried to explain many events that may never be completely understood. The documents are not available to do proper research into these complicated issues. The events of the coup and the aftermath, the details of the Benin invasion, the trial of Banjo and three others will never be fully documented. Yesufu’s book is a welcome addition to the literature about these controversies.
Out of Stock
₦2,000
How and Why the Yoruba Fought and Lost the Biafra-Nigeria Civil War By Dr Jimanze Ego-Alowes
This must be one of the great revolutions of interpretation in Nigerian history. Built on facts, the book guides our gaze towards neglected chronology and meaning of events. The implications make for an inevitable and radical re-evaluation of modern Nigerian history.

If one may suspend disbelief, reading this book will amount to a rewiring of our convictions and concepts about Nigeria and its history.

How and Why the Yoruba Fought and Lost the Biafra-Nigeria Civil War, amounts to a game changing interrogation of Nigeria. The book demonstrates that an implausible conjecture is not only possible but that it has already happened in the past!
 
Ego-Alowes adopts a psychoanalytic approach to the whole drama that is Nigerian politics. Suddenly, all the scattered pieces of our history are pieced to reveal not just where the "rain started to beat us", but also a way forward from the ensuing cold.

Personally, I do not think that the mentioned characters are solely aware of the implications and connotative meanings of their many comments as well as body language; perhaps it is because history has overtime conditioned me to perceive them as political saints. Nonetheless, national gamer or apostle, this is one book to read, for Nigeria's sake.

-Amara Chimeka


Out of Stock
₦3,500
The Nigerian Revolution and the Biafran War By Alexander Madiebo (New Edition)
A retired general of the Biafran Army presents a post-mortem account of the events of the Nigerian civil war, 1966-70. He attempts to explain dispassionately why army officers toppled the civil government in the cause of stability, and the considerable civilian support they received; and the ensuing riots and counter-coup, in the name of reunification, which led to a civil war claiming some three million lives. He presents eye-witness accounts, and from an insider-perspective tells the story of how and why the Biafrans fought the war for almost three years under blockade and in isolation from the outside world, aiming to rectify much perceived misinformation about the war published outside Africa.
₦10,000
Nigeria The Birth Of Africa’s Greatest Country Volumes 1 & 2
Interesting two-volume text.
Parading an array of stars - Adegoke Adelabu, Festus Okotie-Eboh, Mbonu Ojike, Ladoke Akintola, Michael Okpara, Tafawa Balewa, Anthony Enahoro and the larger-than-life trio, Obafemi Awolowo, Nnamdi Azikiwe and Ahmadu Bello along with their many admirers and disciples - the political history of Nigeria which they wrote with their lives and times is vividly recorded for posterity on the pages of these books.
Copiously illustrated with a treasure of ancient photographs, social issues of sports, secret cults, ritual murder, entertainment, the arts, religion, juju, the 1966 coup, the civil war and many others are also prominently featured in this compilation arousing the memories of those who were either too young then to understand what was happening, or who had not been born altogether. The two-volume book is strongly recommended to all Nigerians and the people of all nations and tongues generally, as a well of information about this acknowledged potential giant and most populous black African nation worldwide.
₦6,000
Because I Am Involved By Ojukwu Chukwuemeka
BECAUSE  I AM  INVOLVED ” written by Dim Odumegwu Emeka Ojukwu is a political treatise that centers  on the Author’s perception of the Nigerian political situation with indepth analysis of the peculiarities of the country’s problems and offering unbeatable solutions to these problems.
₦3,500
THE SIX MILITARY GOVERNORS Voices of History by Dan Agbese
The style adopted by Dan Agbese in his compilation of the interviews he conducted in The Six Military Governors, Voices of History: Reminiscences of a Reporter (MayFive Media Limited, Lagos; 2018) as a rookie is novel.

His tributes to both the institution, New Nigerian newspapers, and its editor, Mallam Adamu Ciroma, who discovered and mentored him shows his appreciation for the way and manner these two jointly “conspired” to make him the celebrated writer of books on the profession he hardly knew about before they tapped him.

The author traces the history of New Nigerian newspapers into which Mallam Adamu Ciroma, administrator-turned-editor, recruited him.

Agbese had no previous training in journalism and saw his entry as a stint, from which he would exit within a reasonably short period of time.

That was on July 6, 1967. He is still in the profession and sees the publication of this book as a means of showing his gratitude to the profession, to the organization and to Ciroma who exposed and trained him.

Ciroma made a journalist out of a trained teacher, and Dan will never forget him for making him believe in himself. Dan recalled: “Ciroma was one of the most broad-minded Nigerians it has ever been my luck and privilege to work with. He was a kind and patient man. And he always showed a tremendous understanding of, you guessed it, my non-stellar performance as I struggled to learn the ropes. I could not have had a greater and more kindly mentor; I followed his guidance every inch of the way.”

One of the challenges Mallam Adamu threw at Dan on assumption of duty has resulted in the publication of this book.

Within three months of his assumption, Mallam Adamu threw the challenge to Dan to prepare himself to interview the six newly appointed military governors of the six states carved out of the former Northern Region.

Dan portrayed all the six military governors he interviewed as simple, humble and committed to developing the states the Head of State, Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon had put under their charge.

Gowon, it appeared, had known personally or shared similar perspectives (by attending the same secondary school) with over 60 per cent of them.

₦4,000
The Tragedy of Victory: On-the-Spot Account of The Nigeria-Biafra War in The Atlantic Theatre By Gen. Alabi-Isama
The Tragedy of Victory: On-the-Spot Account of the Nigeria-Biafra War in the Atlantic Theatre is a detailed chronological narrative of the war that lasted from July 6, 1967 to January 15, 1970. With about 500 photographs and maps, the book dwarfs all other previous publications on this subject matter in terms of depth of facts, coverage and accuracy. 

The well-organised, disciplined and efficient Third Marine Commandos, the soldiers in this theatre of the war earlier commanded byCol. Benjamin Adekunle with Lt. Col. G. Alabi-Isama, the Chief of Staff, already controlled the Atlantic coast from Bonny to Calabar before Col. Olusegun Obasanjo's arrival as the new commander.This most-revealing book is in three parts. The first part is an account of the author's life and his first encounter with the army. Under the watchful eyes of a mother who gave the best in moral education to a son of promise, Alabi-Isama's life got shaped by a pre-destined career where the cap really fitted. The second part is about the real combat. It outlines, in detail, the strategies and tactics the commandos employed during the historic 480-kilometre trek from Calabar to Port Harcourt and narrates the hostile climate, terrain and environment, the travails, health and survival hazards they had to surmount on the 30-day march. The think-tank, the mapping out of operations and disciplined control of men and materials by Alabi-Isama, the chief of staff, as well as the officers of 3 Marine Commando Division of the Nigerian army, sustained the Nigerian side of the conflict.

This section concludes with the final successful push by the commandos into Uli-Ihiala, Biafra's 'centre of gravity', a move that ended the war following the surrender of Biafra. The third part is an expose on Obasanjo's book, My Command. The author contests Obasanjo's claims about the war as being inconsistent with the truth and maintains that it is a tragedy that the real fighters of the war for the unity of Nigeria have not been acknowledged to date. Rather, they wallow in poverty and are discredited by their military leaders who assumed political offices with all the accompanying largesse.

The book is a rich manual, a repository of invaluable information and a document that gives a precise and veritable first-person account of the Nigerian civil war, in the Atlantic theatre. It is a must for every serving and retired member of the armed forces to own. Other Nigerians and the international community would find it particularly useful in reconstructing the events of Nigeria's civil war.

Buy From Amazon


₦7,000
IRONSI: NIGERIA, THE ARMY, POWER AND POLITICS BY CHUKS ILOEGBUNAM
When this book first appeared as Ironside in 1999, it drew national attention to a critical view of Nigerian life that had deliberately been obscured with a smokescreen. With its lifting of the veil, new points of analysis gradually gained prominence in the interpretations of the country's political developments. In this edition entitled Ironsi, Chuks Iloegbunam goes beyond the individual level and the web of intrigues that cost General Aguiyi-Ironis his life.

He laments Nigeria's farcial democratic enterprise, condemns the excesses of the political entrepreneurs responsible for the status quo and posits political restructuring that is based on a brand-new, autochthonous constitution as a design for drilling water out of the current pervasive aridity.
₦10,000
Roses and Bullets By Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo

Our past is our past, be it gory or glorious. It is the pathway that leads to the future. Literature, as a laboratory where life – past, present or yet to come – is examined, plays a momentous role. The worst thing people can do is to live in denial. Wars are recurrent features of the history of peoples all over the world. What is most amazing is that love is best engendered by tumultuous situations like wars. In Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo’s novel, Roses and Bullets, published earlier this year by Jalaa Writer’s Collective, war “genesises” both the birth and the death of love.

The lives of many are turned apart by the civil war that broke between Nigeria and Biafra. While things are falling apart, Eloka and Ginika find love in each other. They seal their love when they get married as man and wife. The center holds until young men start being forcefully recruited into the Biafran army. Eloka and many other young men are recruited. Even young Udo gets a feel of the battlefront. With the desire to escape the harsh criticism of her mother-in-law, Ginika attends a gig with a friend. An officer drugs her and has carnal knowledge of her. She gets pregnant for the “faceless” officer. The child dies. Ginika loses almost all: her in-laws; her family and friends; even her love, Eloka. Yet, she doesn’t lose all. She still has the precious gift of life.

₦3,000
A Gift of Sequins: Letter to my Wife By Victor Banjo
Because it is strikingly original, it sheds some light on Nigerian?s recent past. It is the story of a brilliant and courageous man, weighed down by history, and of a woman?s extraordinary stamina to struggle on despite all difficulties. It is presented through the eyes of the children who went through it all. It is a family saga and a national treasure. The book is an overwhelming picture of patriotism, pain, love and joy.
₦3,500
Half of a Yellow Sun By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
An epic story of love and civil war set in Nigeria during the 1960s, Half of a Yellow Sun recounts the lives of three characters caught up in events larger than themselves. Ugwu, a young houseboy working for an idealistic university professor. Olanna, the professor's mistress, and Richard, a British expatriate in love with Olanna's twin sister, Kainene. Their relationships are thrown into jeopardy when Richard spends one drunken night with Olanna, and as the war escalates. 


With Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie firmly establishes herself as a most powerful storyteller and humanist, ''the 21st-century daughter of Chinua Achebe,'' according to The Washington Post Book World. 

The book has won numerous awards and accolades worldwide, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction in 2007.


 

About the Author:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria. Her work has been translated into thirty languages. From the award-winning author, comes a new work 'Amaericanah' a powerful story of love, race and identity.Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, published by Algonquin in 2003, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Broadband Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her story collection, The Thing Around Your Neck, was the winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. A recipient of a 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

₦3,000
Per Page      1 - 40 of 55