Nigeria Civil War

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Ojukwu: The Last Patriot By Valentine Obienyem
The dust generated by Emeka’s administrative work had hardly settled down when, in search of an organization that would escape his father’s influence, he generated another controversy that threatened to separate him from his father for good. He joined the Army! This was in 1957, when the Nigerian Army was merely a part of an all-embracing British West African army called the Royal West African Frontier Forces (RWAFF). These forces included the armies of Nigeria, Gold Coast (now Ghana), Sierra-Leone and Gambia.
₦3,500
House of War By Dare Babarinsa
House of War is a chronicle of the bitter and bloody struggle for political power in Nigeria’s Second Republic, especially among the followers of the late sage Chief Obafemi Awolowo. This is the story about the schism in the Awo camp and how Awoists turned against one another in the great scramble for political office. The book exposes the politicians’ grand auction of principles and the political intrigues, double dealings, back stabbings, stealing of votes, arson and killings, that characterised the Second Republic, especially during the 1983 elections. It is a relevant book, especially for those who have been following Nigeria’s new attempt to establish a worthwhile democracy since the end of military rule in 1999.

About the Author
Dare Babarinsa, a leading Nigerian journalist, graduated from the University of Lagos in 1981; he was the Chief Correspondent of the Concord Group of Newspapers in Ondo State during the 1983 general elections. He was Associate Editor at the leading Nigerian news magazine News watch until 1990 when he joined four other journalists from the News watch stable to establish Tell, Nigeria’s acclaimed foremost weekly news magazine.
₦3,000
WOMEN AND CONFLICT IN THE NIGERIAN CIVIL WAR By Egodi Uchendu
like their Igbo kith and kin east of the River Niger (who led the Biafran revolution and fought the Nigerian federal government from 1967 to 1970) were as involved militarily and otherwise as Biafrans in the confrontation with the federal government all through that period of crisis. In analyzing Anioma women war-time roles, the book draws largely on interviews with women who survived the war, some of whom were adults during the crisis and others who were children at the time.
₦8,500
Half of a Yellow Sun By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
An epic story of love and civil war set in Nigeria during the 1960s, Half of a Yellow Sun recounts the lives of three characters caught up in events larger than themselves. Ugwu, a young houseboy working for an idealistic university professor. Olanna, the professor's mistress, and Richard, a British expatriate in love with Olanna's twin sister, Kainene. Their relationships are thrown into jeopardy when Richard spends one drunken night with Olanna, and as the war escalates. 


With Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie firmly establishes herself as a most powerful storyteller and humanist, ''the 21st-century daughter of Chinua Achebe,'' according to The Washington Post Book World. 

The book has won numerous awards and accolades worldwide, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction in 2007.


 

About the Author:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria. Her work has been translated into thirty languages. From the award-winning author, comes a new work 'Amaericanah' a powerful story of love, race and identity.Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, published by Algonquin in 2003, won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Broadband Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her story collection, The Thing Around Your Neck, was the winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. A recipient of a 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

₦2,500
Last Train to Biafra: Memoir of a Biafran Child by Diliorah Chukwurah
Last Train to Biafra is yet another memoir on the Nigeria-Biafran war. The book however is exceptional in the sense that it ranks among the finest memoirs to be written on the Nigerian-Biafran fratricidal conflict, a must-read for every human being on earth.  In the words of Dr Onyebuchi Ileh, Head, Department of English and Literature, Nigerian Turkish Nile University, Abuja, the book ‘is the most touching account of the pogrom against the Igbos after the 1966 counter coup.’
₦3,000
Everything Good Will Come By Sefi Atta

It is 1971, and Nigeria is under military rule, though the politics of the state matter less than those of her home to Enitan Taiwo, an eleven-year-old girl tired of waiting for school to start. Will her mother, who has become deeply religious since the death of Enitan’s brother, allow her friendship with the new girl next door Sheri Bakare? This novel charts the fate of these two Nigerian girls, one who is prepared to manipulate the traditional system and one who attempts to defy it.

THEREVIEWS

“A beautifully paced stroll in the shoes of a woman growing up in a country struggling to find its post-independence identity…Everything Good Will Come depicts the struggles women face in a conservative society. This is convincing; more remarkable is what the novel has to say about the need to speak out when all around is falling apart.” – Times Literary Supplement, UK

“An original, witty, coming-of-age tale: Tom Sawyer meets Jane Eyre, with Nigerian girls…you can feel the dust and sun. This is award-winning novel is an iridescent introduction to a fascinating nation.” – Observer Magazine, UK

“Again and again Atta’s writings tugs at the heart, at the conscience. At the same time, reflecting the resilience of the Lagosians whose lives she explores, humour is almost constant, effervescent, most often with a satirical twist.” – Sunday Independent, South Africa

“This lively first novel breaks new ground with a close-up, honest story of a contemporary Yoruba woman’s coming-of-age in Lagos. Never reverential, Enitan’s first person narrative reveals the dynamic diversity within the city, the differences across class, generation, gender, faith, language, tradition, and individual character. Differences, yes, but sometimes connections, too.” – Booklist

“Sefi Atta’s first novel has the nerve to redefine existing traditions of African Story telling. It confronts the familiar passions of a city and a country with unusual insights and a lyrical power pointing our literature to truly greater heights.” – Odia Ofeimun, author of The Poet Lied

“Everything Good Will Come is like listening to an old friend recounting and bringing up to date and to life happenings in our beloved city of Lagos. I was sorry when I came to the end.” – Buchi Emecheta, author of The Joys of Motherhood

“What is beyond doubt is that Sefi writes brilliantly with instantly infectious wit.” – Bashorun JK Randle, author of The Godfather Never Sleeps

“There is wit, intelligence and a delicious irreverence in this book. But it is Sefi Atta’s courage in choosing to look at her fictional world through fiercely feminist lenses that I most admired.” – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of Purple Hibiscus

“This is a courageous story about friendship and self-discovery, it is a rallying cry to women to speak out in a world that tries to muzzle them.” – Helon Habila, author of Waiting For an Angel

“An affirmation of faith in one’s capacity, especially female and national, for self-realization.” – Tanure Ojaide, author of Labyrinths of the Delta

₦4,500
THE NIGERIAN CIVIL WAR: FORTY YEARS AFTER WHAT LESSONS By Armstrong Matiu Adejo
Seven years after independence, Nigeria was plunged into a tumultuous political crisis that degenerated into a major civil war, which lasted for thirty months. The war ended in 1970 with great casualties on both sides, especially from the Igbo. The Nigerian government, under General Yakubu Gowon military administration, declared that there was “no victor and no vanquished”. The Federal Military Government went further to implement the famous post war reconstruction programme christened the three Rs: that is Reconstruction, Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. How constructive this programme was still remains the subject of intense debate amongst scholars. Indeed, forty years after the war, thee fundamental issues that caused the war continue to be topical in the politics of the country.

Themes:
In the light of the above, the Historical Society of Nigeria is organizing an international conference on the Nigerian Civil War Forty Years After: What Lessons? The following sub-themes are expected to be considered by interested scholars:

a. Issues and causes of the Nigerian Civil War
b. The course of the Nigerian Civil War
c. Igbo perspective on the Nigerian Civil War
d. Non-Igbo perspective on the Nigerian Civil War
e. Ethnic minorities and the Nigerian Civil War
f. The war economy and its consequences
g. Demobilization and disarmament
h. Refugee Problem and the Nigerian Civil War
i. Post-civil war generation and their perspectives on the Nigerian Civil War
j. Literature on the Nigerian Civil War
k. Nigerian women and the Civil War
l. Resurrection of the Nigerian Civil War/irredentist ideas and movements
m. The Nigerian Civil War and the Wider World

Out of Stock
₦4,000
How and Why the Yoruba Fought and Lost the Biafra-Nigeria Civil War By Dr Jimanze Ego-Alowes
This must be one of the great revolutions of interpretation in Nigerian history. Built on facts, the book guides our gaze towards neglected chronology and meaning of events. The implications make for an inevitable and radical re-evaluation of modern Nigerian history.

If one may suspend disbelief, reading this book will amount to a rewiring of our convictions and concepts about Nigeria and its history.

How and Why the Yoruba Fought and Lost the Biafra-Nigeria Civil War, amounts to a game changing interrogation of Nigeria. The book demonstrates that an implausible conjecture is not only possible but that it has already happened in the past!
 
Ego-Alowes adopts a psychoanalytic approach to the whole drama that is Nigerian politics. Suddenly, all the scattered pieces of our history are pieced to reveal not just where the "rain started to beat us", but also a way forward from the ensuing cold.

Personally, I do not think that the mentioned characters are solely aware of the implications and connotative meanings of their many comments as well as body language; perhaps it is because history has overtime conditioned me to perceive them as political saints. Nonetheless, national gamer or apostle, this is one book to read, for Nigeria's sake.

-Amara Chimeka


₦3,500
My Dialogue With Nigeria By Alani Akinrinade
Alani Akinriade: My Dialogue With Nigeria pulls together the innermost thoughts and view of Lieutenant General Ipoola Alani Akinrinade, former Chief of Defence Staff and pro-democracy activist, on True Federalism in Nigeria and how to archive unity that is equitable and beneficial to all Nigerians.
₦6,000
The Untold Story of the Nigeria-Biafra War By Luke Nnaemeka Aneke
This is the history of the Nigerian civil war, a four-year period of events that have been meticulously and painstakingly tied to actual and specific dates, as well as days of the week, creating the greatest one-volume diary on the civil war, with verifiable and referenced sources. The contents of this book reflect the events of the Nigerian civil war and world reactions, woven together into a simultaneous and situational sequence that creates a real and actual experience to the reader, as if the events were still contemporaneous. The contents are free of the shackles of governments control on both sides of the war. In this book, Dr. Luke Nnaemeka Aneke, presents the Nigerian civil war in a different and unique form - an amalgam of eyewitness accounts from journalists, relief workers, mercenaries, arms dealers, pilots and others, as recorded by independent news sources not controlled by Nigerian or Biafran authorities. In his foreword to this book, the late General Phillip Efiong wrote: “the presentation of this book in the form of a diary of events paints a picture –a historical picture-that is free of rancour and the play of personal emotions”, for which work, according to the general also, Nigeria and the world should be grateful to the author.
₦6,000
In Biafra Africa Died By Emefiena Ezeani
The is a most comprehensive and scholarly research narrative on the Nigeria-Biafra War, which has been described by some academics as “the worst crime against humanity since World War II.”
₦3,000
The Nigerian Revolution and the Biafran War By A Madiebo
A retired general of the Biafran Army presents a post-mortem account of the events of the Nigerian civil war, 1966-70. He attempts to explain dispassionately why army officers toppled the civil government in the cause of stability, and the considerable civilian support they received; and the ensuing riots and counter-coup, in the name of reunification, which led to a civil war claiming some three million lives. He presents eye-witness accounts, and from an insider-perspective tells the story of how and why the Biafrans fought the war for almost three years under blockade and in isolation from the outside world, aiming to rectify much perceived misinformation about the war published outside Africa.
₦3,000
We Are All Biafrans -A Participant Observer’s Intervention in a Country Sleepwalking to Disaster By Chido Onumah
We Are All Biafrans is a collection of essays focusing on the crisis of nationhood in Nigeria.

In this book, Chido Onumah argues that many, if not all, of the problems of Nigeria are rooted in the structure of the country. He makes a case, as he did in his previous books, for the socio-political restructuring of Nigeria. He argues that the country needs to engage episodic political convulsions that threaten its very foundation, including Biafra, June 12, Boko Haram, the “National Question”, citizenship rights, and “militocracy”.


₦5,500
Nigeria/Biafra Civil War : My Experience By Achike Udenwa

Coming barely seven years after Nigeria’s independence, the civil war is, perhaps, the most critical watershed in the country’s annals. Heaps of books have written on that seemingly spontaneous event, but 41 years after the bombs stopped landing and rifles stopped crackling, the last of the war of survival has not been heard.

It has become the proverbial elephant whose different body parts were felt by seven blind men and each had a different story to tell. The latest of the wartime stories comes from a high-profile participant. Chief Achike Udenwa two-term governor of Imo State and former Minister of Commerce has also thrown his hat in the ring in the matter of reliving his own side of war time tales.

If, indeed, there had been any doubts about Chief Udenwa’s claims to being a central participant in the 30-month conflict then his new book captioned Nigerian/Biafran Civil War:My Experince has cleared such doubts permanently.

The 258-page book, structured in seven chapters, excluding preliminaries, strikes at the heart of an event which significance continues to reverberate in the face of current political developments.

In reality, it cannot be said with exactitude that Nigeria has finally overcome threats to its unity; a threat amplified by current security situations such as gave birth, though in varied circumstance, to the war which Udenwa partook in as a very young man.

In the first 76 pages the author took a historical perspective of Nigeria’s political evolution, making copious references to immediate events that eventually culminated in the civil war.

₦4,000
The Forest Dames By AdaOkere Agbasimalo
The Forest Dames is a novel based on war experiences that must be told in order to free the mind, disseminate information and prick the conscience of war agitators. It is a true life story fictionaised to reduce impact.

The book tells the story of a young girl who lived with her parents in the relatively calm and peaceful British colony of Nigeria, where shortly after independence compatriots went for each other’s throats. This soon exploded into a full blown civil war and from that time onwards, nothing was ever the same again.

The war came with ugly incidences, one of which was the hunt for and abduction of girls and women to be forcibly converted to bed mates. Families sought hiding places for their ‘eligible’ females but these hide-outs were soon discovered through the power of and intimidation from the gun. Two women however decided that their daughters will never be made victims. They found a ‘safe haven’ for their daughters – the evil forest where the roars of wild animals were continually heard. But this is nothing compared to the brutal termination of lives and wanton destruction of properties through air, land and marine attacks; including starvation that was the order of the day, and which placed the final death mark on the people.

The forest dames, four in number, survived the war and one of them decides to tell the unfortunate story of the elasticity of human suffering. All four dames are still alive and can be reached for further interactions. One of the brave mothers is also still living.

About the Author
AdaOkere Agbasimalo writes with a passion that underscores her connection with her environment and profound knowledge of the theme of her work. She also has a rare gift in creative writing which enables her to latch on to a theme and very quickly weave her way through the scenes and characters with masterly control. This skill is perceptible in all her works which are unputdownable as they all immediately draw the reader into the story with a commitment to fulfill the objective of the story. Not afraid to grapple with potent social issues in her works, AdaOkere Agbasimalo in her usual candour, set out in the book "The Forest Dames", to recount war experiences from the gender perspective. With typical incisive narrative and imagery, she paints an engaging picture of hate, fear, passion, hunger, deprivation and hope, all the key elements of the crisis of war; eliciting in the reader, profound empathy at all turns. Her thoughts as enunciated in her book "The Forest Dames" should catalyze any mind desirous of equity, justice, fairness and peace in the world, to embrace these virtues. "Mom, you are rare" - Chibueze Benjamin Agbasimalo (son), Student, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State Nigeria. 2004. "Ndaa Ada Agbasimalo, i nwere ezi aha n'ulo di gi, i nwere ezi aha n'ebe i na aru oru, i nwere ezi aha n'umu nna gi". - Chima Eke alias Obareze (Bongo Musician) 2008 in album title Ezi aha ka ego
₦3,500
JP CLARK - A VOYAGE By Femi Osofisan (Hardback)

The definitive biography of “the main animating force of African poetry” 

JP Clark: A Voyage is the definitive biography of Clark by Femi Osofisan, himself one of Nigeria’s most accomplished playwrights. It chronicles the life and career of the man John Pepper Clark – Bekederemo, from his remarkable childhood to his emergence in the 60s among the best and brightest of Nigerian literature. For the first time, JP breaks his silence about the controversial position he took during Nigeria’s Civil War and discusses his relationship with Soyinka and Achebe.

Generally regarded as the most lyrical of the poets of his generation for his simple, down to earth, visual and descriptive imagery, which makes his poems among the most memorable, JP Clark is perhaps the most underrated of Nigeria’s literary giants: Achebe, Soyinka and Okigbo, being the others.

₦6,000
Hubris: A Brief Political History of the Nigerian Army by Akintunde A. Akinwumi

The Nigerian Army is an institution that has played a pivotal role in the affairs of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. For more than half of the 57 years since Independence, Nigeria was directly ruled by a Military Government, largely composed of army officers, and always headed by one. It is impossible to explore any facet of modern Nigerian history or society without the military (and in particular the Army) looming significantly. Whilst several authors have documented the history of Nigeria (and significantly less many of its Army), rarely, if ever, has the impact of the politics of Nigeria on the Army, and vice-versa, formed the exclusive subject of study. This volume is an endeavor to fill that gap.

The period leading up to the Army’s first overt entry into the politics of Nigeria is reviewed, firstly the pre-Independence period, and then the years immediately following independence. The effects of the Nigerianisation of the Army, especially of the officer corps, and of the policy decisions made following the passing of control over the Army from the British to the Nigerian Government are considered. The political circumstances surrounding the Army’s first overt entry into politics - the January 1966 coup - and the political performance of the subsequent first military regime are discussed, as a precursor to the second coup in July 1966.

The impact of the Army’s direct involvement in politics on the military performance of both sides in the Civil War is explored. After a nine-year interregnum, in July 1975 Nigeria returned to the era of coups, with at least eight attempted and successful coups, some of them bloody, over the next quarter century before the return to civilian rule in 1999. The personalities leading the resultant military Governments, and the policies of those Governments, are explored, in an attempt to discern their legacy on the political development of Nigeria, and on the Nigerian Army as an institution.

₦6,000
The Nigeria-Biafra War (1967-1970)-My Memoirs By Patrick A. Anwunah
"As the Biafran Army Commander and therefore, an active participant in the Nigeria-Biafra War, I have written my own account of the war to cover details of tactics and general operational conduct. Colonel (Barrister) Patrick Anwunah, a remarkable Staff Officer both in Nigeria and Biafra, has now through his memoirs, revealed the logistics and general administrative aspects needed to sustain the Biafran Army at war for three years. He has thrown more light on the situation that led to the 'Statement of Peace' by General Philip Efiong to end the war in January 1970."
Out of Stock
₦2,000
The Militant writes Back By Nengi Josef Ilagha

Epistle to Maduabebe is Nengi Josef Ilagha's ninth book in nine years. Its publication on December 18, 2009, virtually brought the author's home state of Bayelsa to a standstill. Trenchant and uncompromising in all twelve chapters, brimming with prophecy for a world gone sour, the book has been hailed as “the height of polemic iconoclasm in Nigeria.”

Its author is the militant poet, journalist, and broadcaster who served time in the government of Bayelsa State as a Speech Writer. Its subject is corruption and greed. Its hope is redemption for a nation that is fast losing its dreams. Its righteous tirade is trained at Dr. Edmund Maduabebe Daukoru, former OPEC President, two-time Minister of Petroleum in Nigeria, and paramount ruler of Nembe, a key oil-producing community in the south of the country, and godfather of the incumbent government under Chief Timipre Sylva-Sam.

₦3,500
The Man Died: Prison Notes of Wole Soyinka By Wole Soyinka
A savage, stabbing inquiry, not into human nature proper, but into human nature viewed through the concave mirrors of solitary confinement and human evil, stretched and warped into horrible familiarity. Soyinka is hard to read, if you read him straight -- this book is most effective when you enter into its twisting, doubling corridors and let Soyinka transform your mind and introspection into a prison of your own. Like most great books, this one works on several levels: an indictment of political injustice, a pyschological study of the prisoner, and (pardon the cliche) a metaphor for the human condition. Brilliant and haunting.

During the Nigerian Civil War (1967–1970) Wole Soyinka was arrested and incarcerated for twenty-two months, most of it spent in solitary confinement in a cell, 4ft by 8ft. His offence: assisting the Biafran secessionists.

The Man Died, now regarded as a classic of prison literature, is a product of this experience. What comes through in the compelling narrative is the author's uncompromising, principled stand on the universality and indivisibility of freedom and human rights.

₦4,500
There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra By Chinua Achebe
In the aftermath of the release of Chinua Achebe's book titled There Was a
Country: A Personal History of Biafra and his article published in the Guardian
on 2 October 2012, there have been many debates about the Biafra war.
Some have accused Achebe of stirring up old wounds by resurrecting the "B"
question, while others are appalled at his comment about Awolowo’s policies,
which Achebe claims resulted in the starvation of millions of people. Some
have suggested that rather than heap the blame on Nigerian officials, Achebe
should have heaped the blame on the Biafran leaders who embarked on a
war knowing that their army was ill equipped to take on the Nigerian forces.
The debate has also taken a tribal dimension with many Igbo’s rallying behind
Professor Achebe, while many Yoruba’s have taken to the opposite side by
expressing their displeasure at Achebe, while defending Awolowo’s legacy.
Regardless of what Achebe said or did not say, it does not deny the fact that
his article in the Guardian and his new book are timely. For a very long time,
the Biafra question keeps on coming up again and again. On one hand, the
Igbo's feel aggrieved by what they experienced during the war, while on the
other hand, the rest of the country feel that the Biafra war occurred long ago
and that the Igbo's should get over it and move on.
Unfortunately, the current debate triggered by Achebe’s article and book has
resulted in many of us focusing on the principal players in the war, rather than
focusing on the underlying issue at hand: i.e. the genocide that took place
during the three year war. One problem with focusing on the principal actors
such as Yakubu Gowon, Obafemi Awolowo, Chinua Achebe, Emeka Ojukwu,
Olusegun Obasanjo, Brigadier Adekunle, Murtala Mohammed etc is that none
of these actors were significantly impacted by the war. They and most of their
family all came out of the war, intact, healthy and alive. However, what we
need to revisit as a nation is the tragic story of the millions of people (majority
children) who died as a result of man’s cruelty to man.
THIS IS REALLY A MUST GET BOOK!
₦3,000
Sunset at Dawn A Novel of the Biafran War By Chukwuemeka Ike
As one of Nigeria's top writers, the author is concerned with the condition of his country. In this novel he tells, with humour, a human story set in the tragedy of the Biafran war. Fatima is fleeing the enemy planes with her young son, and through her unfolding drama, the reader sees what the war was really like through Biafran eyes.
₦1,500
Emeka By Frederick Forsyth
Biafran war. Anioma, the Igbo homeland west of the River Niger, was for long absent in the accounts on the civil war; yet, the Anioma like their Igbo kith and kin east of the River Niger (who led the Biafran revolution and fought the Nigerian federal government from 1967 to 1970) were as involved militarily and otherwise as Biafrans in the confrontation with the federal government all through that period of crisis. In analyzing Anioma women war-time roles, the book draws largely on interviews with women who survived the war, some of whom were adults during the crisis and others who were children at the time.
₦1,000
Our Fathers’ Land : Including Reminiscences On The Nigerian Civil War By Titus Okereke
Titus Okereke treats us to a world worth living in his book, Our Fathers’ Land – Including Reminiscences on the Nigerian Civil War. This is the first book of its class, an autobiographic tale well told, to come out of an alumnus of the old University College, Ibadan, from a graduate of the early sixties, 1960-1964.
₦4,000
Soldiers of Fortune By Max Siollun
“This book is the story of Nigeria’s political journey between January 1, 1984 and August 27, 1993. This is the story of how things fell apart.”

The years between 1984 and 1993 were momentous for Nigeria. Military rule crafted the conditions and character of today’s society, forcing cataclysmic changes on the political, economic and religious landscape that nearly tore the country apart on several occasions.

Soldiers of Fortune is a fast-paced, thrilling yet objective analysis of the major events of the Buhari and Babangida eras. It reveals the true story behind past controversies such as the annulment of the June 12 election, the execution of Mamman Vatsa, the foiled kidnapping of Umaru Dikko, the Orkar coups and the assassination of Dele Giwa.

Historian and lawyer Max Siollun gives an intimate, fly-on-the-wall portrait of the major events and dramatis personae of the period. Soldiers of Fortune is a must-read for all Nigerians and Nigeria- watchers. Its dramatic narrative style will engage casual or academic readers alike.
₦5,000
A Gift of Sequins: Letter to my Wife By Victor Banjo
Because it is strikingly original, it sheds some light on Nigerian?s recent past. It is the story of a brilliant and courageous man, weighed down by history, and of a woman?s extraordinary stamina to struggle on despite all difficulties. It is presented through the eyes of the children who went through it all. It is a family saga and a national treasure. The book is an overwhelming picture of patriotism, pain, love and joy.
₦3,000
Madmen and Specialists By Wole Soyinka
Madmen and Specialists is a play by Wole Soyinka, conceived in 1970 during his imprisonment in the Nigerian Civil War. The play, Soyinka's eighth, has close links to the Theatre of the Absurd. Abiola Irele (in the Lagos Sunday Times) called it "a nightmarish image of our collective life as it appears to a detached and reflective consciousness". It was published in London 1971 by Methuen and in New York in 1972 by Hill & Wang.

Madmen and Specialists is considered Soyinka's most pessimistic play, dealing with "man's inhumanity and pervasive corruption in structures of power". The plot concerns Dr. Bero, a corrupt specialist, who imprisons and torments his physician father.

'Wole Soyinka's Nobel Prize for Literature is a triumphant affirmation of the universality of this novelist, poet, film-maker and political activist.' - Guardian
₦2,950
Roses and Bullets By Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo

Our past is our past, be it gory or glorious. It is the pathway that leads to the future. Literature, as a laboratory where life – past, present or yet to come – is examined, plays a momentous role. The worst thing people can do is to live in denial. Wars are recurrent features of the history of peoples all over the world. What is most amazing is that love is best engendered by tumultuous situations like wars. In Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo’s novel, Roses and Bullets, published earlier this year by Jalaa Writer’s Collective, war “genesises” both the birth and the death of love.

The lives of many are turned apart by the civil war that broke between Nigeria and Biafra. While things are falling apart, Eloka and Ginika find love in each other. They seal their love when they get married as man and wife. The center holds until young men start being forcefully recruited into the Biafran army. Eloka and many other young men are recruited. Even young Udo gets a feel of the battlefront. With the desire to escape the harsh criticism of her mother-in-law, Ginika attends a gig with a friend. An officer drugs her and has carnal knowledge of her. She gets pregnant for the “faceless” officer. The child dies. Ginika loses almost all: her in-laws; her family and friends; even her love, Eloka. Yet, she doesn’t lose all. She still has the precious gift of life.

₦2,000
The Last Flight: A Pilot remembers the Airforce and the Biafran Air Attacks By Capt. August Okpe
(Chapters 15 to 18) recollect the coups, the social/political repercussions, and the dramatic escape of the author and others from their Kaduna air force base. The rest of the chapters (from Chapter 19 to Chapter 52) record the setting up of Biafra Air Force, procurement of a bewildering assortment of aircraft (or more appropriately any contraptions that could fly).
But the story of LAST FLIGHT is far larger and deeper than a tale of war and one service: a gifted story-teller, the author uses the vintage point of Biafran Air Force to knit together the essential happenings in virtually all sectors of the war theatre including its political environment. The book is almost a full picture of Biafra seen through the clear lenses of a major actor, if we discount the opening chapters that help the reader to touch base with the author's early years of professional training. Through the author's integrity of perspective and seamless flow of description of events, the various sectors of the Biafran endeavour appear, not as range of disparate episodes but as an integral network of one gallant collective.
₦7,000
Why We Struck By Adewale Ademoyega
Why We Struck tells the story of the first military intervention in Nigerian politics. The coup that took place on January 15, 1966, was conceived and planned together by Majors Nzeogwu, Ifeajuna and Ademoyega. The execution of the plan had a lightning effect, and the coup provoked a reaction within the first hours of its commencement, opening the floodgate that culminated in the Civil War.

Apart from being a vivid account of one of the most historical events in Nigeria up to date, the book is indeed a souvenir, being the original work of the only surviving member of the trio that conceived and planned the coup.

In this book, Major Ademoyega dispels the popular myths which some people, not directly connected with the coup, have amplified and used for their selfish ends.

A lot has been written about the motivations, actions, and purposes of the revolution that jerked Nigeria into self-consciousness on January 15, 1966. Much of what has been written was merely deduced from what the authors saw or heard. So far, nothing has been published by any of the actual revolutionaries. This is the first authentic account of the revolution. It is written by the only surviving member of the innermost group that planned the revolution.

       “Everything has been done to ensure that this book is accurate and that it depicts the revolution and all that followed it exactly as they were seen from the centre of that great event, which has proved to be the first major milestone in the history of the political development of Nigeria since independence was attained.
My gratitude goes to my friends, who have encouraged me to write this book. I do hope that they and the entire reading public will be enriched in their knowledge of the truth, which is herein depicted.”
     Adewale Ademoyega

                 
₦2,000
The Federal Republic of Nigerian Army: The Siege of a Nation By Major General M. Chris Alli (rtd)
A former general in the Nigerian army, defence attache to Zimbabwe and member of the Abacha caucus, chronicles the role played by the army in Nigerian history, from the first military coup in 1966 to Obasanjo's accession to power in 1998. He describes his own experiences in the army at home and abroad, including a section on his personal interactions with Abacha and the caucus. The author writes in anger at the domination of political hegemony and the subsequent intervention of the military into politics, the perceived dichotomy between people and state, and its implicactions for issues of development and human rights. He states: 'This book is not an indictment of the military of which I am a part. It is my perception of the conduct of my generation and the multifarious forces at work amongst and about them. It is not a verdict on society, rather it is an articulation of the ecstasy, the fears, the constrictions of a nation in turmoil, a nation pulling itself apart.'
₦4,000
Nigeria’s Soldiers of Fortune: The Abacha and Obasanjo Years By Max Siollun

In the cataclysmic decade that is the focus of this book, Nigeria was subject to several near-death experiences. These began when the country nearly tore itself apart after the northern-led military government annulled the results of a 1993 presidential election won by the southerner Moshood Abiola, and ended with former military ruler General Olusegun Obasanjo being the unlikely conduit of democracy.

This mini-history of a nation’s life also reflects on three mesmerising protagonists who personified that era. First up is Abiola: the multi-billionaire businessman who had his election victory voided by the generals who made him rich, and who was later assassinated. General Sani Abacha was the mysterious, reclusive ruler under whose watch Abiola was arrested and pro-democracy activists (including Abiola’s wife) were murdered. He also oversaw a terrifying Orwellian state security operation. Although Abacha is today reviled as a tyrant, the author eschews selective amnesia, reminding Nigerians that they goaded him into seizing power. The third protagonist is Obasanjo, who emerged from prison to return to power as an elected civilian leader.

The penumbra of military rule still looms over Nigeria nearly twenty years after the soldiers departed, and key personalities featured in this book remain in government, including the current president.

₦8,000
Because I Am Involved By Ojukwu Chukwuemeka
BECAUSE  I AM  INVOLVED ” written by Dim Odumegwu Emeka Ojukwu is a political treatise that centers  on the Author’s perception of the Nigerian political situation with indepth analysis of the peculiarities of the country’s problems and offering unbeatable solutions to these problems.
₦2,000
My Command: An Account of the Nigerian Civil War 1969-70
When former President Olusegun Obasanjo penned his war memoirs, he called it My Command, a cocky title since no one expected anything less than command for a general's account of his soldiery during the Nigerian Civil War. Again whose command should it have been? Could he have woven the war tales of another general? Readers would have called him presumptuous. Yet, when his fellow combatants read his story, they called him presumptuous. They implied that the earthy man lied through his pen, the man who ran this country twice, once as civilian and the other as soldier, who claimed victory for the war, who affects the air of the soldier as statesman, who even tinkers with the toga of thinker, was not the soldier he claimed. To his credit though, Obasanjo might have claimed to be a soldier but not a gentleman. Get a copy and read on
₦3,500
The Nigerian Civil War and Its Aftermath by Eghosae E. Osaghae, Ebere Onwuduwe, Rotimi T. Suberu
The Nigerian civil war ended in January 1970. Yet it continues to be the point of reference in political discourses in the country, in part because the attempts to meet the challenges created by the war have themselves created a whole range of new problems and malcontents. These have become the defining elements of the post-war era, and underlie the tensions that have characterized Nigerian politics. The civil war may, therefore, be the turning point in Nigeria's development trajectory that scholars and analysts seem not to have acknowledged. Or it might be that the war is in urgent need of re-interpretation and further interrogation in view of such post-war developments as threats of secession, demands for confederation, and the claim that resource control was at the root of the conflicts that degenerated into civil war.

Whichever it is, however, it is clear that the war has important implications and lessons for the viability and consolidation of democracy in Nigeria, both now and the future. Contributors to this volume examine these implications and lessons from different perspectives.
₦4,500
A BREAK IN THE SILENCE : LT. COL. VICTOR ADEBUKUNOLA BANJO by F. Adetowun Ogunsheye
A Break in the Silence narrates the lifetime of one of Nigeria's foremost nationalists who never played to the gallery for sycophants to hail but was guided by personal convictions, patriotism, and intellectualism. The author chronicles late Lt. Col. Banjo's family setting; military career; involvement in the Nigerian Civil War; the terror unleashed on his family by the then ruling government; his trial by a Kangaroo tribunal and his spirited defense of himself and others; and his subsequent execution by lesser mortals than him.

The book, therefore, is aimed at 'breaking the enforced silence' imposed on the family by time, and deference to Victor's mother, who believed that her son was still alive and could not be so treacherously treated by those he pitched his tent with against all human calculations. Lt. Col. Victor Banjo's actions, which were thoroughly misunderstood especially the side he took during the Nigerian Civil War seem strange in history but his beliefs and speeches were like prophecies; they have come to pass and will continue to be relevant in Nigerian, African and world history. Though Lt. Col. Victor died unsung and unmourned, he is still remembered by those who knew him as a man without prejudices, who came to offer his outstanding conduct, the tenacity of purpose and enduring dreams to humanity.

About the Author, Professor Adetowun Ogunsheye hails from Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State. She is the elder sister to late Col, Victor Adebukunola Banjo. She had her secondary education at Queen's College, Lagos and University education at the Cambridge. University, Great Britain, 1949-1952. She was the founding principal of St. Margaret Secondary School, Ilesha.

The author was the past president of the Nigerian Library Association, 1969-1971 and Nigerian Association of University Women, 1971-1975. Professor and Head of Department, Library Studies, University of Ibadan, 1972-1987 She is also the President of Ogunsheye Foundation. A geographer, educationist, and teacher, she is the first Nigerian Female Professor. A retired Professor has over fifty educational and professionalpublications to her credit. She also writes for children
₦1,500
The Ifeajuna Manuscript By Demola Adeniran

Major Emmanuel IFEAJUNA, the first-ever black African to win a gold medal at a major international sports event and Nigeria’s first-ever gold medalist was more famous for his lead role in the January 15th, 1966 violent coup in Nigeria than for his track and field acclamation of the 1956 commonwealth in Vancouver.

In 1967, he wrote a controversial account of January 15th, 1966 coup in an unpublished manuscript popularly called The Ifeajuna Manuscript; which mysteriously went missing in the hands of some of Nigeria’s best literary minds.

About the same time Major Ifeajuna wrote his manuscript, a British freelance war correspondent, Dan Witszel came to Nigeria with a bequeathed hand made diary to cover the war from the Biafran front. What Witszel didn’t realize was that his ordinary-looking diary had within it, secrets of the most sophisticated oil rig ever designed!

Forty-odd years on, a renowned Nigerian writer, ignited the interest of very powerful individuals in the international oil business when he described Dan Witszel’s diary as the material with which Major Ifeajuna wrote his manuscript. With this new revelation, a clandestine search for the manuscript was then sanctioned by powerful oil executives in London and they sent a ruthless ex SAS man, Robyn Callahan to look for the manuscript at all costs even if it meant murder.

₦3,000
THE NIGERIAN-BIAFRAN BUREAUCRAT: An Account of Life in Biafra and within Nigeria By Onyegbula, Godwin A
Godwin Alaoma Onyegbula was formerly General Ojukwu’s top civilian aide and confidant, and Biafra’s chief ambassador. In this account, he conveys his intimate knowledge on questions such as the Biafran resistance and whether Ojukwu was involved in the coup of 15 January 1966. He further considers the merits of the French/Portuguese/South African axis to the Biafran diplomacy and war efforts; and how the beleaguered Biafran State survived for three years with under-equipped armed forces and wide-spread deprivation. Foreword by Ojukwu himself. 494pp, NIGERIA. SPECTRUM BOOKS LTD.
₦4,000
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